Friday Linkage 10/25/2013

I survived Florida.  Trust me, it is usually an ordeal in some way or another when I venture into Rick Scott’s land of strange.  Thankfully I did not run across any monitor lizards or pythons.  Nor did I fall victim to any sinkholes.  Just an uneventful trip to see the mouse.

On to the links…

America’s CO2 Emissions Hit 18-Year Low—The U.S. Energy Information Administration, a wealth of information on energy issues, estimates that U.S. CO2 emissions in 2012 were actually at levels not seen since 1994.  A lot of this is due to the emergence of natural gas replacing coal in electrical generation and a reduction in the demand for heat due to warmer winters.  It’s still some decent news.

Exploring Solar, Efficiency, Gas and More with Amory Lovins and Joel Makower—If you get a chance to see either of these men speak, it’s a treat.  To get both of them on the stage talking about energy issues is just like Christmas in October.  Take a break and enjoy the talk.

Clean-Water Laws: The Second Front in the War on Greenhouse Gases—It’s not just about regulating emissions explicitly.  There are solutions to the issue of regulating greenhouse gas emissions that are much more covert.

The World Isn’t Keeping Up With The Need To Invest In Sustainable Energy—  To address the coming threat of climate change and keep warming to a “manageable” 2 degrees Celsius, the world needs to invest ~$625 billion per year through 2020.  Currently, the investment is at ~$359 billion.  It’s a pretty big shortfall, but what amazes me is that the total figure ($625 billion) is about what the U.S. spends on its military when you account for operations in Afghanistan and other ancillary defense agencies.

0.3% of GPD Would Protect East Asia from Climate Change—So, we can spend a large but manageable amount now to mitigate the impacts of climate change.  Or, we can ignore the signs and deal with apocalyptic conditions later on.  Guess which one the world will choose?

Koch Brother Wages 12-Year Fight Over Wind Farm—William Koch rarely hits the news like his more politically active brothers.  Usually, he is in the press for the strange western frontier town that he has built in Colorado.  Well, it looks like he hates renewable energy as much as his brothers.

To Expand Offshore Power, Japan Builds Floating Windmills—Thankfully the Kochs are not Japanese because it looks like Japan is going to go all in on offshore wind to replace nuclear power as the backbone of the countries electrical generation.  It will be interesting to see if a large investment can push the industry forward.

First Auction of Solar Rights on Public Lands in Colorado Draws No Bids—I was surprised to read that no one bid on the rights to build solar projects in southern Colorado.  Then I read the end of the article and was amazed at the amount of solar power already on-line in the region.

Residential Solar is a Middle Class Phenomenon—It looks like the Koch brothers, all three of those clowns, are not the only rich people who do not like renewables.  Apparently, its relatively well-to-do middle class households that like renewables.  At least when it comes to residential solar.

Independence Through Microgrids: When The Power Goes Out, Some Are Just Going Off The Grid—Every time a disaster hits where the grid is knocked out, stories flow about how a few islands—powered by renewables—kept the lights on and served as community hubs.

How The Department Of Energy Is Working To Reduce The Cost Of Solar By 75 Percent—The balance of system costs—those costs associated with a solar system that are not panel related—continue to bedevil systems as the costs prove sticky.  However, more effort is being focused on bringing those costs down.

Eating Raw Whale Meat While Dishing up Baloney — How Industry is Imperiling the Oceans While We Aren’t Looking—Man, it’s frightening just how fudged up large companies are making the world’s oceans.

Now this is Natural Food—I do not know why I have never read about the idea of perennial food systems.  Sure, permaculture has a place in the reading list and I try to incorporate some of those principles into my landscape but this seems different.

Fifteen Tons of Groceries, Sailing Down the Hudson—I have linked to articles about the Vermont Sail Freight Project before.  It is cool to see pictures of the initial voyage to New York City.

Where Do Baby Carrots Come From?—If your house is anything like mine, baby carrots are consumed in large quantities.  My children will eat bowlfuls after school or at dinner without any encouragement.  It’s interesting to see the journey to the grocery store for this staple of snacks.

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