Tag Archives: Bangladesh

Friday Linkage 10/16/2015

Made it out of Los Angeles. Barely. No, seriously, I thought I might get stuck forever walking the mile and a half from the car rental return to my airport hotel. Two dead ends and a convoluted route finally got me to my destination. Maybe it is true that no one actually walks in Los Angeles.

On to the links…

Dire Glimpses of What Pollution Is Doing in Bangladesh—Bangladesh is not a nation that is at the fore of the consciousness of the West. The fact is that the nation will likely be devastated by climate change and that has the potential to destabilize the entire region.

California Bans Microbeads to Protect Marine Life—California has done what should be done at the national level. Microbeads should be outlawed immediately.

Wyoming Made It Illegal To Take A Photo Of A Polluted Stream. Now They’re Being Sued For It.—This case needs to be watched because it will set the boundaries for what can be done to prevent the use of citizen science and journalism to expose the threats to our natural world.

Chile to Create One of World’s Largest Marine Parks around Easter Island—Marine parks may be one of the few good tools we have to preserve pockets of ocean health as our rapacious appetite destroys the oceans.

The World is on Target to Get 26 Percent of Energy from Renewables by 2020—This is according to a new report by the International Energy Agency.

Gorgeous 11MW Bioenergy Plant in Leeds will sort 214,000 Tons of Waste Each Year—In Leeds the black bins collect general household waste and it will be converted into energy at this amazing power plant. Damn, I want one of these in my town to replace the ugly coal turning into natural gas hulk that inhabits the south side of town.

Chinese Solar to Jump Fourfold by 2020, Official Tells Xinhua—Get ready for solar to feel the “China price” phenomenon full force in the coming five years.

Solar Power Bids Fall By Over 50% In 5 Years In India—Think about a 50% reduction in price in 5 years. It is a pretty wild decline in the price of solar power.

Big Victory in Minnesota Will Retire Coal, Ramp up Wind and Solar—Xcel Energy has bent to the will of its ratepayers and will retire fossil fuels in favor of renewables. The support for renewables in Minnesota is simply amazing right now.

This Startup Wants To Plant One Billion Trees a Year Using Drones—I love this idea for drone technology. Think about reforesting huge swaths of rugged country following wildfires or beetle kills with drones instead of people. We live in the future.

Church Protests That Bike Lane Would Impede Their Free Practice of Religion—In a post-Hobby Lobby world I am anticipating that churches will object to everything on the grounds that it impedes their personal freedom to practice religion. Granted, it’s generally a load of hogwash but that is the world we live in today.

A Farmer Explains Why Fall Is the Best Time to Join a CSA—Maybe this is the fall where I make the leap and join another CSA. Maybe…

Who Is the Wet Prince of Bel Air?—What does 12 million gallons of water per year even get from a landscaping and lifestyle perspective?

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Friday Linkage 1/30/2015

It is almost February. Wow. It’s about time to start thinking about spring planting and summer projects that need some planning to pull off. I am really hoping that this year will be the season where I start to bring my landscape closer to my ideal state. Stay tuned.

On to the links…

White House Proposes Protecting More Than 12 Million Acres Of Alaska’s Arctic Refuge—I am glad to see someone trying to put drilling in ANWR to bed once and for all, but I feel like the eastern seaboard of the U.S. got sold out to try and make this happen.

‘World can cut carbon emissions and live well’—Too often the debate sounds like status quo on one side and primitive living on the other, but to combat climate change—which really comes down to cutting carbon emissions—our quality of life does not have to suffer. Granted, the measurements of quality of life are critical to making that determination but still…

7 Interesting Global Renewable Energy Trends From NREL—The growth of renewables is starting to reach a tipping point in the U.S. after decades of fits and starts. Every time I drive somewhere in town I imagine solar panels on every south facing roof.

Solar Costs Will Fall Another 40% In 2 Years. Here’s Why.—The balance of system costs, like installation and permitting, are finally beginning to fall at a pace fast enough to bring down system costs.

U.S. Wind Power Installations Swelled Sixfold in 2014—The headline number here is that the U.S. added ~4.7 gigawatts of onshore wind power capacity in 2014 versus just 764 megawatts in 2013.

Offshore Wind Energy Would Produce Twice as Many Jobs as Oil and Gas Operations in the Atlantic—Let’s remember that the jobs produced by oil and gas drilling can be replace by jobs in clean tech industries. It’s forgotten too often as we debate another round of offshore drilling leases in American waters.

The Solar Industry is Creating Jobs 20x Faster than the Rest of the US Economy—Oh wait, the solar industry is killing it when it comes to jobs.

US Navy + Air Force Commission 120 MW Of New Solar Power Plants In Florida—Florida may suck for individuals wanting healthcare or solar energy, but the U.S. military is going to go ahead and make it happen for themselves. Does Rick Scott suck or what?

Bangladesh Wants to Become the World’s First “Solar Nation” by 2021—Bangladesh may be poor, but the country does not lack ambition.

More Than 125,000 UK Homes Installed Solar PV Last Year—This is in the U.K. which is not a place known for its sunny climate.

SkyMall’s Demise Could Save American Airlines $350K a Year on Fuel—If you doubt the power of little things adding up, consider the case of removing those silly SkyMall catalogs from the seatback pocket of every airplane in American Airlines fleet.

Ecopolis Iowa City: As State Leads in Wind, Can Iowa City Become ‘City of Solar’—Just thirty miles to the south of me and I completely missed this going on. Huh.

11 Must-Know Cleaning Tricks to Green Your Routine—Getting the toxic, harsh, and just plain nasty chemicals out of our daily cleaning regime is a necessary event for every household. Trust me. When I walk into a place that has been cleaned with something more mainstream my senses are assaulted.

10 Handy Hacks for Emergency Situations—The snow-pocalypse may have spared New York City, but hammered some other parts of the northeast. It is still a good idea to think through how you would survive a few days without electricity or heat. It’s not a prepper thing.

You Must Read—Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming

If you spend enough time around researchers or market analysts you will learn one adage—it’s not what a company says that is important, it’s where a company puts its money that matters. This is not just about “following the money” per se, but trying to determine where a company thinks it is wisest to invest for the most return.

9781594204012As you read McKenzie Funk’s Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming it is readily apparent that there are a lot of people all around the world who are betting on a very different climate in the near term.

Whether it’s the coming thaw in the Arctic that will allow for reliable shipping through the famed Northwest Passage or the inevitable fight that will occur over the oil and minerals long buried beneath ice choked landscapes there are companies and governments betting on that future. It is telling that they are not betting on a future where the potential warming stalls out and the landscape looks like it does today. How does that make you feel about international climate accords? Thought so.

The business of global warming is actually pretty frightening. As wildfire season begins again in the American west—if it ever really ends anymore as persistent drought is the rule of the day—insurance giants are turning to private fire companies to protect high value properties. It’s a libertarian’s wet dream in warmer world. Private fire companies pale in comparison to what the business of water in a hotter and drier world looks like. Parts of the world will also get wetter, but the amount of potable freshwater will decline so it is not really a net gain.

Funk’s book is not just about the business of global warming, but the radical restructuring of our complex civilization that may occur because of climate change. Some places will witness sea levels rise more than others because of plate tectonics, ocean sub-floor, etc. It’s not fair because the places most likely to be dramatically affected are the same places that emit very little carbon on a per capita basis. No one in Bangladesh is responsible for global warming.

Apparently there are winners in this global reordering as Greenland will likely move closer to independence based on the fact that it has rich resources which will become viable for extraction as glaciers melt into the sea. Greenland’s gain, Denmark’s loss, and the world is just screwed in general.

The one real takeaway from Windfall was that the people who are most likely to see their lives washed away are the poorest and least responsible for the changes brought about in the Anthropocene. Rich people in the developed western world will build flood barriers and desalination plants and move to higher ground, but there are billions of people who cannot. How chaotic will our future be when we have displaced hundreds of millions if not billions of people? That is really scary.

Friday Linkage 12/21/2012

I have spent a lot of time “offline” the past week.  Part of it is related to the events in Newtown, Connecticut.  I just wanted to spend a little extra more time with my two children because I could not imagine the horror of having either of them taken from this world in such a savage way.

Also, it was a snow day on Thursday.  Iowa and the rest of the upper Midwest got walloped on Wednesday night and Thursday morning.  Here in Cedar Rapids we got anywhere from 6 to 9 inches of snow and had winds that blew in excess of 50 miles per hour.  Pretty much a textbook blizzard.

Everything slows down on a snow day because no one goes out.  Life really turns inward toward the household.  Snow days are most excellent.

On to the links…

EPA Goes After Dangerous Soot Pollution–This is one of those “boring but very important” type of stories.  Soot is dangerous on so many levels and the EPA is taking steps to clamp down on the emission of soot.  Good deal all the way around.

Cleaning up Carbon Pollution 101–This is a good run down of the facts surrounding the issue of carbon pollution.  Read it and be informed for the next time you have to argue about carbon pollution with your libertarian Uncle Walt who lives in Phoenix.

Exploring a Proposed Carbon Diet for American Power Plants–The Natural Resources Defense Council has come up with a proposal for reducing carbon based power generation in the United States that focuses on all aspects of the chain.  It’s pretty fascinating stuff for people who read up on this kind of thing.

To Save the Oceans, Should We Zone Them?–I do not know if this would really do any good because individuals, corporations, and countries are not know for being sticklers when it comes to rules.

Detect Drafty Windows with Your Smartphone–Does anyone ever sit back and marvel at just how freaking cool our smartphones really are?  These things are like something out of Star Trek but better somehow. 

Small is Big, Bangladesh Installs One Million Solar Home Systems–I am excited by the potential of the developing world to leapfrog the centralized and heavily carbon based electrical generating systems that dominate in the West.  Here is just another story about the power of distributed generation.

Plans for Giant 1.2GW Wind Farm Submitted–Not that big energy projects cannot be fascinating or get us closer to a carbon free future.  The East Anglia Offshore Wind (EAOW) will provide 1.2 gigawatts (imagine Doc Brown saying it) or the equivalent of about 770,000 annual electricity consumption.

Feds Scrap Dumb Idea of Relocating Otters–Who thought this was a good or plausible idea in the first place?  Why would an animal suddenly decide to stay in a place where it was unfamiliar?  Because some agent from the state fish and wildlife service packed it in a crate?  Sure.

Imagine There’s No Fracking–It’s easy if you try.  Sean Lennon and Yoko Ono recently ran the following ad in the New York Times:

Fenton_Fracking_NYTimes_fullpage_bw