Tag Archives: Canada

Friday Linkage 3/10/2017

There will be no Friday Linkage next week since I will be in Colorado enjoying all that Beaver Creek has to offer a low-rent skier like myself.

On to the links…

Iowa Sees Second Warmest February in 145 Years—Nothing to see here, right?

These Photos Show How the EPA Transformed America—Now that the fox is in charge of the hen house it is important to remember what America was like before the EPA and other agencies focused on cleaning our air and water.  No one wants to bring disco back and no one wants to bring 1960s style pollution back either.

Scientists Are Standing Up to Trump Because They’ve Always Stood Up to Bullshit—The right wing loves people to be active in politics as long as they agree with their narrow world view and, generally, assume positions that are free from a factual basis.  “But, Jesus said so in the Bible!”  Scientists and scholars are duty bound to resist this shit.

Yet Another Energy Company Bails On Canadian Tar Sands Oil — Is Koch Next?—Tar sands are too expensive to extract under the current market conditions, too dirty for most people to accept as a fuel source, and stuck in Canada.  So why exactly are people in the fossil fuel industry and the White House so hell bent on the Keystone XL pipeline?

California Just Hit an Incredible Solar Power Milestone—It was for just a moment, but California was producing some serious solar power in the middle of the day.

Colorado’s Solar Power Capacity Jumped 70 Percent in 2016—The best part for me is that even though Colorado added 70% more capacity its relative ranking compared to other states feel because it did not add enough capacity.  When you add 70% more capacity in one year and lose ground you know that something is happening that is going to be hard to stop.

Solar Now Cheapest Electricity Option On Average In 58 Emerging Economies—The new guard of electricity is here and it is based on the sun.  These countries have no incentive to build out a fossil fuel based grid because they have no capital investment tied to legacy systems.

Chinese Coal Draw-Down Gathers Pace—China is always the savior of some down-on-its-luck industry.  Guess what?  China does not want our coal anymore.

Coder Creates Ultimate Tesla Model S + Home Solar Data Visualization Tool—I cannot create the fuel for my truck at home, but I could create the fuel for a Tesla Model 3 or Chevy Bolt at home.  The future seems to be happening right now.

America’s Television Graveyards—When the apocalypse comes in the next couple of years I imagine people will roam the shattered United States and happen upon one of these warehouses full of old CRTs.  It will be a gigantic metaphor for how we got into this mess.

General Mills Boosts Eco-Friendly Grain Kernza—What if we could replace a portion of destructive annual wheat production with perennial Kernza?  What is wide strips of Kernza were planted along streams to slow runoff and deter erosion?  Imagine the potential.

Climate Ecoforestry—Let’s look to restorative ecology to rebuild our planet’s lost resilience.

This Man is Cloning Old-Growth Redwoods and Planting them in Safe Places—Imagine efforts like this replicated on a larger, dare I say nationally mobilized scale, and imagine what we could achieve in a short period of time.  This requires no new technology or process.  It would simply require political will and capital.

You’re Using Recipes Wrong—I have this complaint with cookbooks and recipes because I feel like I am buying bespoke ingredients only to repeat effort time and time again.  Ugh.  An efficient kitchen in terms of time and money should be one of my 2017 goals.

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Friday Linkage 4/17/2015

Hillary is in. Marco is in. I am sure that we are going to here from Chris Christie and a host of Republican also rans…Mike Huckabee and Rick Santorum really do not have a lot on the calendar about now do they?

The crazy thing is that the national media cares more about this story than any single person in Iowa save for the self-important campaign operatives who act like gatekeepers to the caucuses. Ahhh, the summer before a caucus in Iowa is a beautiful time.

On to the links…

Ocean Acidification Triggered Devastating Extinction—Here is a simple concept: If the oceans die, we probably die. Save the oceans and you have a good chance of saving the human race plus a good chunk of this planet’s biodiversity. Otherwise it is game freakin’ over.

Overfishing in U.S. Waters Hits All-Time Low—We can make policy that helps the oceans. It’s just too bad no one seems to focus on some of the limited success that we have had in modulating our piss poor behavior.

Permafrost’s Ticking “Carbon Bomb” may Never Truly Detonate—A slow leak is better than an explosion, so to speak, but this is still a major problem when considering how to combat global climate change.

Forest Service Sticks up for Coal Mining on Roadless Lands—Why? Why would an agency of the federal government actually encourage coal companies to destroy wilderness in the pursuit of a fossil fuel that is in its long cycle death throes? Oh wait, it’s the Forest Service. This should be their logo:

selling_the_forest_for_the_trees

Are You Ready for Corn-Powered Hydrogen Fuel Cells?—Hydrogen powered transportation was a bait-and-switch from the Bush administration almost as good as Iraq having WMDs. If hydrogen, which is really just an energy storage mechanism, can be produced in a way that is not energy intensive it is a good solution.

Striking Chart Shows Why Solar Power will Take Over the World—This chart reminds me of those I used to see in the late-1990s showing processor power and cost. It was a way to explain the previously unimaginable proliferation of computer controlled objects. Guess what, solar is coming like a freight train of awesome:

solar-price-installation-chart.jpg.662x0_q70_crop-scale

U.S. Predicted To Be Net Energy Exporter In Next Decade; First Time Since 1950s—Maybe we should not drill, baby drill and keep some of that energy in the ground for the time being.

In The Midst Of Toxic Oil Spill, Vancouver Announces It Will Go 100 Percent Renewable—This is not some small city in the sun belt of the U.S., but a major Canadian metropolis in a the somewhat overcast Pacific Northwest. Granted, it’s over the next 20 years but if it happens it will be a big deal.

100% Renewable Electricity By 2050 Possible In France—If it’s possible by 2050, why not get it done sooner? What are the obstacles and how do we overcome them?

Investment In Australian Renewable Energy Industry Plummets 90%–Here is why we cannot get to 100% renewables sooner. Policy makers screw up, insert uncertainty into the planning process, and slow down progress. What a joke.

Dubai Will Invest $3 Billion To Boost Solar Power Project Capacity To 3 GW—Sometimes all it takes is some oil money to get the job done.

4 Ways to Invest in the Low-Carbon Economy—Our personal investment choices are rarely something we think about as a tool against climate change but our 401ks and IRAs may have thousands or even hundreds of thousands of dollars that could be focused on positive investments for the planet.

How Refrigeration Determined What We Eat and Where We Live—Trust me, millions of people would not move to the Sun Belt if there was no ice cream or ice cold air conditioning.

How to Successfully Grow an Herb Garden—It’s that time of year when everyone has grand garden plans, including myself. Maybe a little herb garden is all we really need:

The-Herb-Growers-Cheat-Sheet-infographic1

Friday Linkage 12/5/2014

Work travel really sends me for a loop. I leave for Thanksgiving break and before I sit down in the office again it is December. Pretty soon I will be hurtling down I-80 towards Colorado and Christmas vacation in the mountains.

On to the links…

Fracking Boom could go Bust Faster than Obama Thinks—There are a lot of energy experts who believe the recent surge in U.S. fossil fuel production via fracking is going to be a short lived moment. Basically, it might buy us until 2020 when fuel prices will again soar. Time to invest this dividend into solar!

Tar Sands Development Financially Unsustainable, Report Shows—Dirty, dirty tar sands oil is only economically viable if the price for oil stays above $95 a barrel. At current prices the production is a big time money loser and investors might lose out big. If that happens it will be decades before the industry recovers. See what Texas looked like in the mid-1980s.

India’s Installed Solar Power Capacity Crosses 3 GW—The expansion of solar is down this year compared to last—800MW versus 1GW—but India is making some real strides in deploying grid scale solar.

China’s Solar Energy Progress Sputters—Everything seems to be bigger in China these days, but solar power installations seem to be falling short of stated goals. Last year 13 gigawatts of solar came on line and that number falls to 10 gigawatts in 2014, which is a reduction from a goal of 15 gigawatts. Still, it’s a lot of solar power.

World’s Largest Solar Power Plant Is Now In Operation—The Topaz project features over 9 million solar panels and has the capacity to generate 550 megawatts of carbon free juice. Damn. I want one.

Animated Guide To The Solar Rooftop Revolution—Rooftop solar is coming to a roof near you. Distributed generation is an amazing trend that could really change the face of the utility market forevermore.

New Solar Cell Efficiency Record Set At 46%–Solar is getting cheaper because of better manufacturing, competition, and the constant drive to extract more energy from every speck of silicon. 46% efficiency is pretty amazing.

How Wind Energy Is Subsidizing Albertan Ratepayers—Yep, wind power was driving down the pool price for Alberta ratepayers.

Wind Industry Is An Economic Shot In The Arm—So, as the argument over the extension of the wind production tax credit wages in Washington maybe every politician who says they are concerned about jobs ought to consider the economic impact of the wind power industry.

Solar Uniquely Positioned to Help States Meet New Regulations—Solar is the way forward in reducing emissions. If we could replace coal megawatts for solar megawatts the impact would be huge. Smokestacks and mines or roofs and panels…your pick.

Florida Fails to Support Solar Energy for Homes and Businesses—Florida is pretty much the worst. If there is a policy that might help people or the environment you can rest assured that it will be dead in the water. It’s a swampy hell hole.

NextEra Buys Hawaii’s Biggest Utility To Study Renewable Energy in the Island State—NextEra is viewing Hawaii and its isolated grid as the perfect laboratory for the transition to clean energy. It also helps that executives will now get to make “business” trips to the islands.

Beyond-the-Grid Is Not Just About Light, It’s About Resiliency—Not being dependent on fragile centralized systems is a good strategy in a world that is going increasingly strange.

Antibacterial Soap Ingredient Triclosan now Linked to Liver Fibrosis—At what point does everyone just stop using triclosan? The stuff is not actually effective and it has a whole host of side effects.

How We Can Make the Food Supply Chain More Eco-Friendly—Marlyhurst University put together a nice little infographic showing the ways in which we can “green” the supply chain for our food:

Green-Food-Supply-Chain-Infographic-2

Friday Linkage 5/30/2014

This is going to be a short list of links because I am currently on a plane heading to Denver with my brother to spread my parents ashes near the Continental Divide. The upside to this depressing event is that I get to sample some great beers from Front Range brewers. More to come.

On to the links…

Obama to Unveil Rule to Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions—With no action possible in Congress, the President will issue a new rule through the EPA under the Clean Air Act to, in essence, cut greenhouse gas emissions from coal fired power plants. Republicans will howl that this is an “imperial President,” but conveniently forget how much they liked the same kind of action under the second Bush. It’s called progress.

There is Still Hope for the Climate: Regional Cures for Planetary Fever—I do not know if I am so positive anymore, but some part of me hopes that we cobble together a patchwork of solutions that will avoid the absolute worst of climate change and leave it to our children to fix the mess. We suck as a species.

Wind Energy In 2013 Was Equivalent To Taking 20 Million Cars Off The Road—It’s amazing how much wind energy has been deployed in the United States. Now imagine if we could have a similar commitment to deploy residential solar at this level. Damn.

Ohio Is Poised To Be The First State To Roll Back Its Renewable Energy Standard—Just when you think you are making real progress, ass clowns like those in Ohio’s legislature, egged on by Republican a-hole Governor John Kasich, decided to gut the state’s RES. Progress be damned in the face of Koch money!

On the Road to Green Energy, Germany Detours on Dirty Coal—Following the nuclear disaster at Fukushima, the German government pledged to get the country out of the business of generating power from nuclear sources. While laudable it does mean that the country is going to have to turn to coal to meet its commitment.

‘A Government Of Thugs’: How Canada Treats Environmental Journalists—Apparently, my view of Canadians being easy going was dead wrong when it comes to the government’s treatment of environmental journalists and activists. It’s an insidious thing for a government that claims to be transparent to act as an agent for private development, but it is the nature of our modern governments that this is the case. If you do not believe this to be true, just review the case of Tim DeChristopher.

Resiliency+: Distributed Generation and Microgrids Can Keep Lights On During the Next Storm—Every time there is a storm or major power disruption on the east coast of the United States this topic comes up because somewhere in the center of the problem was a microgrid powered by renewables that kept the lights on. Maybe it’s a trend now.

Turbines Popping Up on New York Roofs, Along With Questions of Efficiency—I guess that in order to attract trust fund hipsters a developer needs to include some sort of greenwashing for their project.

The Time My Mom Got Me A Tiger—It’s not what you think. This video talks about the problem of captive tigers being used for photo opportunities and the chance he got to “adopt” his tiger.

Strange Brews: The Genes of Craft Beer—I brew a lot of beer and the science of yeast really escapes me. It seems that it does not make a difference in some recipes and, yet, in others the difference is marked. What gives?

Chef Dan Barber on the Farm-to-Table Movement’s Next Steps—I don’t always agree with Dan Barber’s ideas about food as I find them to be difficult to scale in order to “feed the world” but nonetheless he is an important influence in how the system develops.

Solar Roadways: A Modest Proposal?—I love seeing this idea get press outside of the normal “green” outlets. One thing lost in the discussion about these panels is that it does not even have to be used on roads to be really effective. How many square feet of driveway, sidewalk, and parking lot exist in just the united states that could be covered with the material? Just saying.

Ford’s Customers Tested Its New Trucks for Two Years, and They Didn’t Even Know It—I am watching the development of the next generation Ford F-150 with a lot of interest. For one, I own an F-150 for work. Second, it’s the best selling vehicle in America so any technology deployed successfully on this platform will likely find itself adopted across a broad swath of vehicles. Of most interest is the new aluminum body, replacing traditional steel, that is purported to cut over 700 pounds off the weight of the truck in the interest of fuel economy. Interesting.

Friday Linkage 2/14/2014

During the winter residents of the Midwest who have lived here more than a few years are pretty stoic about the cold and snow.  This winter, with its epic cold snaps and constant moisture events, have made people look toward days where the temperatures sneak above 32 degrees Fahrenheit with a hunger bordering on salacious.

Next week’s anticipated temperatures above 40 degrees Fahrenheit will feel downright tropical.

On to the links…

Sustainable Nuclear Fusion Breakthrough Raises Hopes for Ultimate Green Energy—Nuclear fusion is the holy grail of green energy development and would alter the face of the world if it could be made to work at a scale that was economical.  Every step forward toward that goal is important, even if it is incremental at best.

Company Has Yet To Stop Leaks That Have Been Spilling Tar Sands In Alberta For 9 Months—Do you want to know what the future looks like if we fully exploit Canadian tar sands?  Look no further than this leak in Alberta that has been occurring for the past nine months.  Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. should be ashamed but they will probably just use it as an excuse to push for more development in some twisted logic that only an oil man would understand.

Pipe Break At Coal Facility Contaminates West Virginia Waterway—Can’t West Virginia catch a break.  Not when your state is owned by coal interests.  It looks like Patriot Coal, the spinoff of everyone’s favorite coal villain Peabody Coal, is responsible this time.  The company will find a way to weasel out of paying any damages.

6 Ways Ted Cruz Wants To Increase Carbon Pollution, All In One Bill—Ted Cruz is really swinging for the fences as he attempts to position himself as the presumptive wingnut nominee for President of the United States.  Please run.  It could be worse, we could be hearing from Rick Santorum.

U.S. Average Fuel Economy Increases In January—Not all U.S. energy news was bad this week.  Fleetwide U.S. fuel economy increased to 24.9 miles per gallon in January 2014.  The surprising part of the statistic is that “green” cars like hybrids and EVs actually saw sales fall, but high mileage traditional engine cars made up for the decline with marked improvement in fuel economy.

Wind of Change Sweeps Through Energy Policy in the Caribbean—Aruba was spending close to 16% of its annual income on fuel imported from outside the country.  By 2020, the island nation hopes to be free of fossil fuel imports.  If a small island nation can commit to the transition why can’t more countries?

India Wants To Switch 26 Million Water Pumps To Solar Power Instead Of Diesel—We all love the idea of rooftops covered in solar panels, but there so many applications for solar that do not involve residential electricity.  What is the market for 26 million systems look like?

Interactive Map Shows 47,000 Onshore Wind Turbines in U.S.—Maps are cool.  Maps that show wind turbines are really cool.

California has One-Third of Nation’s Solar Jobs—This is not surprising given the scale of California’s solar programs and companies like SolarCity being established in the state.  It also gives hopes to other states that have great solar resources to exploit in experiencing job growth associated with a new industry.

I Spent 28 Hours on a Bus. I Loved It.—Meteorologist Eric Holthaus decided to reduce his personal carbon footprint.  The most significant single driver that he could impact was to cut out flying.  Read about trying to travel long distances in this country without using air travel.

14 Food Waste Facts That Will Make You Want to Change the World—One of the easiest changes that we can make on a personal level to reduce our carbon footprint is to stop wasting food.  The statistics about food waste are kind of mind bending.

7 Things Republicans Would Be Shocked to Learn About Ronald Reagan—For most Republicans Ronald Reagan stands atop the their personal Mount Rushmore even though a lot of his actions in office run counter to their current crop of ideals.  Taxes?  He raised them.  Illegal immigrants?  Amnesty.  Guns?  Regulated.  Tear down this myth already.

Amid Elephant Slaughter, Ivory Trade in U.S. Continues—Yes, the idea is that the ivory predates rules about the traffic in illegal ivory but it is impossible to enforce.  There should be a complete ban on the sale of ivory goods in the U.S.  Plain and simple.

Camels Had No Business in Genesis—One can never make the “Bible is literal” crowd believe because their default retort is impossible to assail even as it is the most asinine belief system in the world.  Science is just a lie to these people.  What amazes me, however, is how prominent many of these whack jobs have become.

You Must Read—Meat: A Love Story: Pasture to Plate, a Search for the Perfect Meal

Eat less meat.  Eat better meat.  (Page 258)

Meat is central to our idea of food.  It is primal.  A person’s position on meat—somewhere along the well-defined spectrum of vegan to Texan—defines so many other food beliefs that it is difficult to imagine a discussion about the future of food, or the present for that matter, without delving into meat.

9780425227565Susan Bourette’s Meat: A Love Story: Pasture to Plate, a Search for the Perfect Meal seeks to forge a conversation about meat’s place in the modern discussion about food.  In the prologue, the author writes:

The carnivores are back.  It’s like a bitch-slap to all those reedy, high-minded herbivores who have demanded nothing short of a bloodless revolution, dictating the parameters of the discussion, decreeing the rules for years.  Now it’s the meat-eaters who have wrested control of the food debate.  (Page 5)

No doubt.  Sometime during the past decade, vegetarians and their various sub-categories of various extremes have ceded control over the debate about the future of food.  It’s not about finding a tofu-based alternative to bacon, but finding bacon that comes from pigs raised and slaughtered in the best way possible.  The debate is over what is best now.

The problem is that we are separated from our food in a way that would have been almost unimaginable decades earlier:

Yet for most of us, meat is a mystery.  We know less about how it arrives on our plates than ever before in our history.  In part, this can be traced to urbanization, a population disconnected from agriculture and major corporations investing in the industrialization of meat production.  But something more is at play: our knowledge of foodstuffs is gleaned from a reading list of ingredients on the back of the package and not from hands-on experience.  (Page 41)

Jamie Oliver did a smashing job of showing how disconnected our children, and therefore our future adults, are from food when he asked a classroom of kids what various fruits and vegetables were in whole form.  Pictures of fairly common vegetables—I am not talking about alien looking kohlrabi here—went unrecognized.  Meat is not an animal to most people anymore.  It is a shrink wrapped slab of protein on a foam tray in a refrigerated case at the supermarket.  It is always been said that no one would eat meat from the major U.S. suppliers if they saw first-hand what the conditions were like for the animals and the process of factory slaughter.  Bucolic it is not.

Meat comes to our table as part of a larger system.  Like anything in modern agriculture, the meat on your table is the end result of a lot of actions and actors.  Therefore, the way in which the meat is raised from day one is important:

Turns out, we not just what we eat but also what our animals eat.  It’s welcome news in this puritanical age of culture that has dissected gastronomy into minute bits and bites of fat grams and trace minerals.  At a time when we think of the dinner table as a booby trap, jerry-rigged with potential landmines and enemies.  When our first question is not “Is it good?” but “Is it good for me?”  (Page 164)

If you treat the animals right and feed the animals good food then the questions of “Is it good?” and “Is it good for me?” can be answered in the same positive “Yes.”

Some of the vignettes in Meat are odd.  Obviously, the foray into raw meat dining in the high country of Colorado counts as odd.  This is not a story about paleo diets, but pre-fire diets.  Given what we know about dangerous microbes—our knowledge of beneficial microbes is pretty small—there is something to be said for utilizing the cleansing power of fire.  I am not a total advocate of pasteurization, but I do not subscribe to some pre-pasteurization ideal in that everything bad with the world comes from our obsession with cleanliness.  Some destruction of microbes is good for our health in the long run.  Sorry to bust your bubble cave people in Aspen.

I also find the piece about whale hunting in Alaska off-putting.  It’s annoying when practices are defended as cultural tradition, therefore somehow immune from criticism, even if the larger world finds the practice abhorrent.  In general, we do not accept barbaric practices on cultural tradition grounds when it comes to concepts like slavery or infanticide or…pick something that seems like it is from Game of Thrones.  Sure, the killing of whales for sustenance has a long history in the native peoples of the Arctic but times change.  Whatever, I feel like I am screaming at the wind on that one.

At times, Bourette’s prose reads like a burgeoning treatise on the gender issues surrounding meat whether it’s regarding the whale hunt in Alaska or the hierarchy on the line in a Houston kitchen.  These are easy tropes for a writer to insert—little woman in the big, bad world of meat—but they do little to advance the central tenant that meat is a central component of our food system regardless of gender.  I suppose that the imagery is just loaded with gender stereotypes because of societal conditioning—the man of the house carving the turkey or tending the grill—making it almost impossible to write about meat, or food in general, without falling prey.  Michael Pollan was accused of gender “baiting” in his most recent book because when we hear the words tradition, kitchen, and food together people automatically assume it is a diatribe about female abandonment of the domestic arts.  Whatever.

The most salient point in the entire book is not reached until near the end:

The secret of boudin is the secret of all good food.  You can watch, you can learn at the hands of the master, but the fact is that all good food is rooted in time, place, and culture.  It is idiosyncratic, unique, and expressive of the place where it’s made and the people making it.  The closer the food is to the place, the more it defines its makers and eaters, the more intense its flavors.  (Page 248)

This is something I have tried to explain to people for years.  Some foods just fit a time and a place that does not necessarily correspond to its absolute place in the culinary world, as if such a ranking were to actually exist.  No one is going to place loco moco at the top of the food pantheon, but on the first morning in Hawaii no other food puts me on “island time” quite like the gut busting local favorite.

Friday Linkage 10/12/2012

A good and productive week here at the house.  I installed a blower unit on my fireplace, put two batches of beer into carboys, and managed to stay out of trouble at work.  A roaring success.

On to the links…

Activist Tim DeChristopher Released—Tim DeChristopher, the activist who slowed down the leasing of public lands to fossil fuel companies, was released from prison following his sentencing for that very act.  In reality, he was imprisoned because he bid on the leases with no intention of paying and was unrepentant.  Normally, when a corporation cannot pay or chooses not to pay for the bid upon lease rights there is no criminal penalty.  I guess corporations are people too my friend.

Recessions Cannot Save Us from Climate Change—One of the surprising stories to come out of the Great Recession was that carbon emissions fell because people, in general, consumed less stuff.  Too bad that trend is over and carbon emissions are back on the way up.

Antarctic Sea Ice Loss Animated—In case you needed an animated example of why we are cooked.

How Wind Power Helps Lower Electricity Prices—This is not something that you are going to see Mitt Romney or Paul Ryan talk about on the stump when railing against wind power tax credits or brining up Solyndra for the millionth time.  Wind power is a good thing.  End of story.

The Future of Oil and Gas—If you have some time on a cold day, sit down and read this report cover to cover.  It is filled with useful insight into the future of the oil and gas industry as seen from one viewpoint.  I think it also illustrates the cracks and lever points for renewables to exploit going forward.

Chicago Pushes the Limits on Sustainable Streets—Streets are such a huge part of the built environment that reimagining what these landscapes can be is a critical component of creating a better urban environment.

Walking the High Line’s Incomplete Third Section—The High Line in New York City is one of those projects that just seems to get endless press.  I can see why, it’s just such a cool project.  Now every city is going to try and figure out what industrial relic they can turn into a bucolic attraction. Good luck.

Coyotes Next Door—Apparently, coyotes are the pioneer species of larger carnivores to move into human dominated environments.  I always found coyotes more annoying than anything when I lived in rural Minnesota.

Farming the Urban Sea—I just love how this article shows how much potential there is in revitalizing the ocean habitats near our urban centers and what benefits that we can accrue from that process.

If You Want to Feed the World, Stop the Land Grabs—Oxfam and other international agencies just seem like agents for Big Ag and Big Food.  The answers are always the same to the problem of feeding the people.  Just grow more export commodities and then use the money to feed the people.  Wait a second.  Why not use the land to grow food to feed the people and not lose anything in the conversion to hard currency?  Just saying.

Five Acre Farms in New York—I love the idea of a co-op forming to market local foods to a large urban area.  It seems to solve the major problem of local producers integrating into larger supply chains because they do not sell in the volume required to be a supplier.

Video Inside of a McDonald’s Beef Processing Plant—Sure, it’s a Canadian plant doing the process, but you get the idea about how the process works in turning ground beef into burgers for your dollar menu extravaganza.

Twelve Great Posters from When Turning Down the Thermostat was Patriotic—  Man, I love me some propaganda from World War II.  Nothing like being Chilly Willy for the troops: