Tag Archives: EV

Friday Linkage 2/21/2020

I do not understand the United States anymore.

Somehow, Donald Trump and Rush Limbaugh feel empowered to talk about values.  These are two men who have no values other than accumulating wealth and power for themselves at the expense of others.  Yet, people listen to them and feel that they are trusted sources of opinions on any number of issues for which they should be considered rank hypocrites.

Maybe this is just a dark valley that we must pass through in order to reach a better place.

On to the links…

Climate Crisis could Cause Economic Recession ‘like we’ve never seen before’—Cats and dogs living together.  You get the idea.

The Enormous but Hidden Consequences of Antarctica’s Record Heat—Sometimes I feel like whatever hope I have for humanity is just crushed by an onslaught of bad news.

Good News: USA Had Largest CO2 Reduction In The World In 2019—Remember, this occurred in a country where Donald Trump was president.  Imagine what could happen if we had actual leadership.

Here’s What Happens To Nature When Humans Get Out Of The Way—I have an idea.  Why don’t we stop destroying nature for the profit of a few and give nature a chance to recover?  Oh wait, profiteers do not care about anything except money because they feel that they can buy their way out of the apocalypse.

Can We Actually Stop Using Fossil Fuels?—It is not a question of can we, but rather what would civilization look like.

Cheap Natural Gas is Making it Very Hard to Go Green—I know natural gas is cheap right now and people are building business models based on that reality.  However, anyone who has watched the natural gas market understands that there is an inherent volatility that tends to destroy the best laid plans of man.

Electric Cars Are Better For The Environment Than A 50 MPG Gasoline Car—Electric vehicles are intrinsically more efficient than an ICE vehicle.  So when your Uncle Carl starts spewing about your Tesla using coal fired power from the grid just slide this image across the table:

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Unless he is driving an ICE vehicle that gets more than 50 miles per gallon he is less efficient in terms of emissions.  Suck it Uncle Carl.

11% Electric Vehicle Share In France!—This is not a small number.  Car markets tend to move slowly with regard to change since a car is a durable good item that lasts a long time and is quite expensive.

The Electric Pickup Wars are About to Begin—As someone who currently owns both an EV and a pickup truck I can only hope that this is a true since I would love to consolidate my fleet down to a single vehicle in the next five years.

Electrifying Heat, Transport And Industry Can Lead To Deep Carbon Cuts—From the “no shit Sherlock” file.  Listen, this is not news to anyone who has been talking about these issues for the past two decades.  However, this is an article in Forbes so we have to consider that these opinions are fairly mainstream now.  Progress is never a straight line.

Volvo Trucks VNR Electric First Drive Review—Short haul heavy duty truck routes are a big emissions source.  The solution to the problem is here.

New Biorefinery Research Adds Bite To Reforestation Bark—Planting trees is a good thing.  If those trees can do more than just be normal trees I guess that is all that much better.

Can the U.S. Slash Food Waste in Half in the Next Ten Years?—My assumption is that our food waste issue is a result of laziness.  Like everything lately, it seems like it is going to take a crisis to reimagine our relationship to any number of pressing issues.

Jeff Bezos Spent More on this House in Beverly Hills than Amazon has Paid so far in Federal Corporate Income Tax for 2019—Wow.

First Step in a Path Toward Deeper Decarbonization

Once you have purchased an electric vehicle—in my case a used 2015 Nissan Leaf—and installed solar panels—in my case a total of 24 panels for a nameplate capacity of ~7.5 kWh—you are left with a question: how do I further decarbonize my household?

If you live in a single family home in the United States there are a surprising number of places where fossil fuels are being used on a daily basis.  Most home owners do not really consider these sources of carbon emissions.

Consider the lawn.  Anyone with an inkling of environmental conscience understands that the turf grass monoculture that dominates our landscape is essentially a hellscape of inappropriate plants, harmful chemicals, and energy intensive maintenance.

In my household we have abandoned the chemicals and I am ripping out sections of turf grass as often as I can in order for it to be replaced with perennials suited for my region.  However, I am left with some amount of turf grass and social expectation that this grass be mowed on a semi-regular basis.

Trust me, I have pushed the bounds of both social expectations and legal ramifications over the years by allowing parts of my lawn to go weeks without seeing the spinning blade of a lawn mower.

Nonetheless, I am bound to some degree to maintain a well-manicured lawn.  As a good suburban homeowner I spent the last nine years mowing my lawn with a traditional gas powered push mower.  I dutifully filled it up with a small amount of ethanol free gasoline every few weeks and spent about an hour clipping my grass down to the maximum height setting.

Thankfully, a series of mechanical mishaps aligned with my desire to rid myself of this pollution spewing beast.  How much pollution does a mower release, you ask?  It depends upon the source and methodology, but according the EPA lawn mowing accounts for up to 5% of the United State’s total air pollution.  Not to mention the millions of gallons of gasoline that are spilled filling mowers.   Add in the oil required for four stroke engines and you have a lot of fossil fuels being consumed to keep our lawns high and tight.

Now, I could have rolled old school with a reel mower as someone will surely point out.  I would also ask that person if they have ever mowed more than a few hundred square feet with one of these contraptions.  Seriously, another eco-minded neighbor bought one and every household with an interest tried it once.  Reel mowers are the Zima of lawn care.  You try it once and never think about it again.

Strolling the aisles of my local Home Depot—an activity one is likely to engage in when waiting for your child to complete soccer practice—I noticed a clearance sticker on a Ryobi cordless electric mower.  Now was the time to jump on the electric lawn mowing bandwagon.

For less than the cost online of a regular push mower—battery electric or ice—I took home a battery electric self-propelled mower.  The 40V mower came with a single 5-amp hour battery.  If I believe the online reviews this battery should provide about 45 minutes to 1 hour of cutting depending upon usage.  We shall see.

Additionally, I purchased an extra battery online.  The cool thing about the 40V Ryobi tool line is that with such a large installed base there is a healthy aftermarket in third party batteries.  I was able to get a compatible battery rated at 6-amp hours for less than $80.  With two batteries I should have more than enough capacity to complete mowing my lawn.  Again, we shall see.

For the first time in forever I am looking forward to the beginning of lawn care season if only to see how the electric revolution applies.  The march toward a deeper level of decarbonization carries on.

Friday Linkage 2/14/2020

Well, New Hampshire may have finally cooked Joe Biden.  If it was not his primary night performance it may well have been him calling a woman at a meet and greet a “lying dog faced pony soldier.”

The thing that gets me about Biden is that he did not run in 2016 when he was the sitting vice president.  He did not jump into the race until relatively later this time around.  His supporters do not seem so much enthusiastic about his candidacy as they seem obliged to support the man.

Maybe he should spend some time commiserating with Corn Pop about the good old days.

On to the links…

Global CO2 Emissions “Flatlined” In 2019, New Report Claims—The methodology might be in question, but maybe there is hope for us humans yet.

Drilling Under Slickrock Is Dumb—I take that back.  Most humans appear to be idiots.  Especially the humans behind oil and gas drilling.  Their entire worldview is defined as “drill everywhere and drill now.”

Is The US Coal Industry Completely Burned Out?—Do not weep for the coal industry.  We will be picking up the pieces from this industry’s destructive sweep for decades, if not centuries to come.

More Electricity From Renewables Coming To Australia—Every additional megawatt of renewable energy is a positive step forward.

The Biggest Municipal Solar Farm in the US Is Coming to…Cincinnati?—Red state, blue state…it does not really matter.  People want access to renewable energy.

Arizona and the Momentum of 100 Percent Clean Energy—Arizona is not the most friendly state for renewable energy despite the abundance of sun and open space.  If a state with retrograde politicians like Arizona has the momentum to get to 100% renewable energy we know that the worm has turned in our favor.

Sales Of Gasoline & Diesel Cars Fall In Australia As Sales Of EVs Rise—It’s a zero sum game in a market that is not growing.  If someone buys an EV that consumer is not buying an ICE.

This Ultra-Strong Nanomaterial Could Cut Carbon Emissions — and it’s made out of garbage—If this is real then it is really cool.

The Low Price of Freed Parking—Just think about it this way: If you work in an open concept or cubicle office environment it is extremely likely that your automobile is allotted more physical space than you are given.  What is the price of parking now?

The Hidden Biases that Drive Anti-Vegan Hatred—There is a lot of vitriol thrown at the direction of vegans.  Just witness the late Anthony Bourdain comparing vegans to Hezbollah.

No One Can Explain Why Planes Stay in the Air—These kind of articles just freak me out.

January 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

Okay, January kind of sucks if you are living the electrified life.  On average, January and/or February are the worst months for solar production and EV efficiency.  Why?

For my solar photovoltaic array the answer is in two parts: snow and clouds.  For part of the month, it is common for my panels to be covered with snow.  I have tried my best to knock the snow free with a foam roof rake, but this is really just scratching at the surface of the problem.

The second part of the problem is that the month of January is just not that sunny in eastern Iowa.  The sun came out on Saturday and everyone in the house sort of looked surprised.  It was a “Do you remember the last time you saw the sun” kind of moment.

The end result is that you do not make very much electricity.  For the month I am unsure of just how much my PV array produced because my monitoring setup is still not reporting correctly.  Needless to say, I know that I was in the hole ~400 kWh for the month.  Ugh.

The cold weather will also bit you on the rear end when you are driving an EV.  Granted, the cold weather will also impact the efficiency and performance of an ICE vehicle as well.

When you turn on the heat you watch your range and efficiency go into the tank.  On my 2015 Nissan Leaf which uses a resistive heater I can see the “guess o’ meter’s” range drop by at least 30% and more like 40% usually.

If it gets cold enough the “guess o’ meter” will also show less range because the batteries are chilly and cannot discharge as well.

To add insult to injury, regenerative braking is not as effective in the cold weather so more energy is lost to heat in the form of actually using the brake pedal.

However, given all of that downside I still managed to drive 850.5 miles at an average efficiency of 4.7 miles per kilowatt hour.  This compares with the same period last year where I averaged just 3.6 miles per kWh.  I chalk that up to the weather not being quite as harsh and me understanding how to wring more mileage out of my little Nissan Leaf.

For the month I saved ~953 pounds of CO2 from being emitted versus my prior vehicle assuming an average carbon intensity of electricity from the grid.

Like most people in eastern Iowa I am kind of excited to see February be here because it means an end to the ceaseless political ads and a potential break toward more electrified living amenable weather.

Friday Linkage 1/17/2020

It’s a little more than two weeks away from the Iowa caucus and things are getting testy.  Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren are feuding about electability.  Tom Steyer is being Tom Steyer.  For some reason people actually think Joe Biden would make a good president.

All of this must be placed against the backdrop of the ultimate goal—defeating Donald Trump in such a demonstrative way that the MAGA hats become just as toxic as Confederate battle flags and white hoods.

On to the links…

Good News, Even in Darkness—It is easy to be pessimistic and it is hard to be optimistic in today’s world, but we must address things in a positive way.  We are in a dark valley.  There is light on the horizon.  We must keep pushing forward.

Negative Carbon Dioxide Emissions—This is the goal.  Not net zero, but net negative.

BlackRock’s Larry Fink: Risks from Climate Change are Bigger than the 2008 Financial Crisis with no Fed to Save Us—When the manager of a massive fund—over $7 trillion dollars in assets managed—says that the investment community better be prepared for climate change I am hoping that the markets listen.

The Solution to the Plastic Waste Crisis? It isn’t Recycling—The solution is to stop buying plastic stuff.  Actually, the answer is to just stop buying so much stuff.  Don’t worry about being a savage minimalist who excises the material demons from their home.  Just stop buying stuff and the space will naturally open up through attrition.

The Dark Side of ‘Compostable’ Take-Out Containers—Even if it is compostable, it is probably ending up in the trash.  If it is not reusable, it is probably ending up in the trash.  Plus, it’s really only compostable in specialized facilities as opposed to the black plastic bin in your backyard.  Trust me, I put one of those corn based forks in my bin as an experiment.  Two years later it still looked pretty much the same.

US Electricity: Solar Up 15%, Wind Up 9%–Now, imagine that these trends keep happening year after year.  The back of the envelope calculations show that solar would double every 4.8 years and wind would double every 8 years.

Iceland Reaches 25% EV Market Share! When Will The World Follow?—The world will follow when we price gasoline according to its impact on the climate.  Once all the externalities are accounted for there is no way people are going to pay a per gallon price for gasoline that is orders of magnitude higher than what we see at the pump today.  Just imagine if the United States figured out how much we spend on military adventures in the Middle East and applied that to each gallon of gasoline sold in the country?

Soil Health Hits the Big Time!—The dirt under our feet is full of possibilities.

Can New Bus Lines Chart a Course to Better Travel Options in the West?—The United States is never going to have the passenger rail network like Europe.  That is a good and a bad thing.  It is good when you consider that Europe will never have the heavy rail cargo network of the United States.  It is bad when you consider that transportation emissions from personal vehicles is such a big part of our climate change puzzle.  Maybe modern bus lines could help fill the gap.

Your $14 Salad’s Not as Eco-Friendly as Advertised — but Sweetgreen’s Trying—The key thing is that the company is trying.  We all need to keep trying.  BTW, who buys a $14 take out salad?

Panera Is Making Its Menu More Plant-Based to Become More Sustainable—The more mainstream vegetarian and vegan options become the better off we are as a society.  There is no reason why every fast food hamburger should not be some version of a Beyond Burger or Impossible Burger.  Why?  These are not the pinnacle of taste and texture.  Plus, the volumes of beef that would be replaced are tremendous.

Skiing is Better Without Performance Trackers—Apps that track our performance on the hill are killing the vibe.  I spent this Christmas break skiing without the Epic Mix app telling me how many vertical feet I had skied or what “badges” I had acquired.  It was freaking glorious.  Do you know what I thought about the whole trip?  Skiing.

Final Report on 2019 “Resolutions”

It is time to take stock of my so-called New Year’s resolutions for 2019 and see how I did.

Without further ado, here is the list:

  • Decarbonize transportation—My 2015 Nissan Leaf has been in the garage for about a year.  Over that time ~7,987 miles at an average efficiency of 5.2 miles per kWh. The Leaf saved ~9,119 pounds of CO2 being emitted compared to my prior vehicle.  Furthermore, I added ~62% generating capacity to my home’s solar photovoltaic array so for 2020 I should be driving on sunshine 100% of the time.
  • No more Amazon—A little bit of failure and a little bit of success. I definitely spent a lot less money at Amazon than in prior years, but it speaks to the company’s ubiquity that I ended up buying anything at all.  Want to buy that odd little gadget?  Guess what, Amazon is about the only place to find fulfillment.
  • No more Walmart—A little more success as I the only trips to Walmart were few and far between for the year. Over the course of the entire holiday shopping season it never entered into my mind to even shop there.  Once a store is no longer part of your “consideration set” that has to be considered a success.
  • Read twenty five books—51 books read.
  • Drink local—Pretty good, but I think I can do better in 2020.
  • Declutter my house—Fail. My family and I spent some time getting rid of old clothes and other stuff that was taking up space in our closets.  However, it feels like we replaced whatever we got rid of over the course of the year.  I know that I will never be a fervent follower of Marie Kondo’s methods nor will I ever embrace modern minimalism.  I thought I could do a little better.
  • Replace existing toilets with low volume flush models—One toilet was replaced. A second toilet is scheduled to be replaced in January.  The third toilet in the house does not get enough use to merit replacement at this time.
  • Plant at least five trees—Two Norway spruce trees are in the ground.  Three Colorado blue spruce trees in the ground. Mission accomplished.
  • Reduce lawn coverage—Fail. I had the best of intentions to start replacing some of my lawn with mixed plantings and landscaped beds.  While I got the trees in the ground the rest of the plan did not come together.  This is where I am going to focus my 2020 landscaping efforts.
  • Ride 2,500 miles on gravel roads—Over 3,000 miles ridden on the year. Mission accomplished.

 

For 2020 I am going to try and build on what was done in 2019.  The goal is to improve each year.  Different goals or different metrics, but the overall theme is improvement.

Stay tuned!

December 2019 Solar Production and EV Performance

The additional capacity for my solar photovoltaic array was finally turned on in the middle of December.  For some reason the monitoring software is screwed up—probably because it is tied to the old inverter that is now powering an array for a friend in northeast Iowa.  It is my hope that the issue is resolved in the next few days and I can start comparing total production of the array.

Regardless, I have a decent idea of how I am doing relative to total consumption versus total production using the readout from my bi-directional meter.  For December I ended up using ~208 kWh more than I produced.  Considering that my system was not operational for half of the month I am going to take this as a good sign that I should now produce more than I consume most months out of the year.  In the past December has been one of the worst for solar production.

Knowing my numbers at the beginning of the year it is my estimate that I will be net positive when it comes to total consumption versus total production even including my electricity usage for driving my Nissan Leaf.

For the month of December I drove my Nissan Lead 574.7 miles at an average efficiency of 5.0 miles per kWh.  This translates into a CO2 savings of ~651 pounds compared to driving my prior vehicle assuming an average carbon intensity of electricity from the grid.

For the entire year, I drove my Nissan Leaf ~7,987 miles at an average efficiency of 5.2 miles per kWh.  I think this is a pretty good average efficiency based on what I am seeing on forums and what not.  This represents a savings ~9,119 pounds of CO2 compared to driving my prior vehicle assuming an average carbon intensity of electricity from the grid.  It also represents ~$1,132 savings in fuel costs assuming I draw power from the grid at my residential rate.