Tag Archives: monitoring

March 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

My solar monitoring platform was available for an entire month and all of the panels on my solar system were fully functional.  This led to a pretty good March for solar production:

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Just under 578 kWh for the month.  This compares with ~316 kWh in 2019 and ~424 kWh in 2018 or an increase of ~83% and ~36% over each of those years respectively.  My guess is that the average year-over-year production increase will fall somewhere in the middle of those two on average over the course of the next year.  Only time will tell.

For the month, my household ended up “net positive” ~67 kWh.  My household was also “net positive” in March.  It is my assumption that the next couple of months will be big “net positive” months in terms of electricity consumption versus production since the period before the hot summer months is generally light on consumption.

One factor driving a lower level of electricity consumption is the fact that we are not driving much, if at all, as a household due to COVID-19.  All of my children’s activities have been cancelled and we are working from home.  I cannot remember if I have charged my Nissan Leaf in the two weeks we have been home from an aborted spring ski trip to Colorado.

For the month, I drove my Nissan Leaf ~652 miles at an average efficiency of 5.3 miles per kWh.  Almost all of those miles were in the two weeks before we locked down at home.  I “saved” ~746 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions compared to driving my truck assuming that I pulled all of the electricity from the grid at my utility’s average carbon intensity.  In the first quarter I have “saved” ~2,785 ponds of carbon dioxide emissions.  Given that I am now producing more electricity via my solar panels than my household is consuming, including EV charging, those carbon dioxide savings are even greater.  The same logic goes for the fuel cost savings.

April is going to be a weird month for sure.

Back to Full Strength

At least in terms of solar photovoltaic production.  Last week I wrote about my solar array having a single panel that seemed to be out of commission for some reason.  I was able to diagnose this via the monitoring platform that is part of my system from Moxie Solar.

Here is what things look like today:

Physical Layour Fixed

You will notice the formerly inoperable panel in the top right corner is producing electricity like a good boy.  The problem was a loose connection that took about five minutes for a tech to diagnose and repair.

Now I can put a few more clean, green electrons back into the grid.

The Importance of Solar System Monitoring

Once a solar system is installed, the local utility has signed off, and the city inspectors give the go-ahead there is a moment of relief as the lever is finally pushed into place.  Once operational, your photovoltaic array sends clean and green electrons through your home’s electrical system and out into the world.  Hopefully.

A lot of monitoring systems give you a picture of the total photovoltaic system.  You can usually see how much the system is producing in aggregate and maybe you get a picture of your production versus consumption.  However, there is a level of system monitoring below this aggregate level that is critically important.

Take a look at the following system layout:

Solar Physical Layout

Notice anything odd?  Look at the top left corner.  Notice the panel producing 0 kWh of electricity?  Something is wrong.  It could be a bad panel.  It could be a bad connection.

Had I not had access to a panel by panel breakdown of production I would never know that one of my panels was not producing.  Now it is easy to request service and it should be a quick fix rather than a laborious process of diagnosing the malfunctioning part of the system.

February 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

The monitoring platform for my expanded photovoltaic array is back online:

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It was only turned on for the last few days of the month, so I do not know how the system performed for the entirety of February.  However, in just four days the system recorded more production than the entire month of February last year.  Granted, the array was under ten inches or more of snow for most of that time last year.

Overall, I ended up nearly even in terms of production versus consumption.  The actual number was approximately 4 kWh “ahead.”  I am figuring that I will end up “ahead” of consumption for most months here on out until January rolls around again.

The crazy thing was that if I had driven a normal amount this month I would have been even more in the black.  Due to a work commitment out of town for an entire week I drove approximately 50% more miles per day on average in the month of February.  Those highway miles added up to a lot of extra driving at a not so efficient clip.

For the month of February I drove ~973 miles at an average efficiency of 4.6 miles per kilowatt hour.  That driving used ~212 kWh of electricity and saved ~1,086 pounds of CO2 being emitted, assuming all electricity was pulled from the grid at an average carbon intensity for my region of the country, versus if those same miles were driven in my truck.

This is What the Future Looks Like

Last week the installers from Moxie Solar completed the installation of eight additional solar photovoltaic panels on my west facing roof and the attendant upgrades to the electrical system (e.g. larger inverter).

Here is what 62% additional solar capacity looks like from the road:

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See anything?  That is right, you do not see anything out of the ordinary save for a standard suburban house.

Here is what that same additional solar capacity looks like from the west side of the house:

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This is what the future looks like.  Twenty four panels—sixteen 290W panels and eight 360W panels—producing green electricity every time the sun sends its rays our way.  These panels do their thing every day without nary a thought or action from me.  Silent and motionless these panels produce clean electricity.  This solar array will produce more than 100% of my household’s electricity needs including an electric vehicle.

If this is not the future than I have no idea of what will come to pass.

My New Addiction

One of the great features of my SolarEdge inverter is a monitoring system that produces a great looking dashboard:

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There is an app for my phone that shows the same information updated at fifteen minute intervals.  Damn, this is addictive.  I check it probably ten times a day to see what my new toy is doing.

Now that I mention it, I wonder what the production is right now…