Tag Archives: Mosaic

Deschutes Brewery Fresh Squeezed IPA

HyVee’s Fuel Saver program is the devil. You walk into the liquor store thinking you are going to pick up a fifteen pack of All Day IPA and instead you end up with something completely different because you saved $0.25 off per gallon of gas. This is how I ended up with two six-packs of different beers from Deschutes Brewery. In my defense, a total of $0.50 off per gallon of gas ends up saving me $10 when I fill up with the maximum of twenty gallons. Easy to do when road trip summers are here.

When Deschutes Brewery first came into the Iowa market I tried several of their beers and came away liking them in general. It’s been a while and I have not been tempted since for various reasons. The first beer I cracked open was Fresh Squeezed IPA:

Fresh SqueezedI had passed this beer on numerous occasions, read the label, and thought that with a name like Fresh Squeezed it should have been a fresh hopped beer. Damn marketing.

The beer pours a darker amber color than most IPAs, which makes me consider this more of an American Pale Ale. What does that mean? Whatever marketing wants it to mean, but in general I think it means more malt and body than a traditional IPA.

All of this extra body means that the beer drinks a lot easier than its 6.4% ABV and 60 IBU would suggest. Being near the golden ratio—in my opinion—of ABV to IBU the extra body of the beer hides some of the downsides of having more bitterness and bite. It essentially mellows out the more extreme elements of the alcohol and hops.  Fresh Squeezed is brewed with a combination of Citra, Mosaic, and Nugget hops. None of these really stand out as the driving element leaving the profile a little muddled or muted. Again, I was kind of bummed that this was not a fresh hopped beer.

In summary, you can do a lot worse in terms of mainstream pale ales and you ought to give Fresh Squeezed a try if you are looking to broaden your pale ale palate:

Two Mug PurchaseSee what others are saying about Deschutes Brewery Fresh Squeezed IPA at Beeradvocate.

New Belgium Slow Ride IPA

When you cut back on drinking beer you begin to curate your selection a little bit more because each bottle seems like part of a zero sum game. I did not give up drinking so much as curtail it down to a few bottles per week. Moderation if ever there was such a thing.

If there is one trend that has made it easier for me to stop brewing my own beer—never mind the entire drinking a lot less beer—has been the emergence of “session” IPAs. The adjective session has lost a lot of meaning in the past couple of years, which is no surprise given the wide ranging style differences that can occur under previously well understood definitions like IPA or stout.

New Belgium Brewery recently came out with Slow Ride IPA. It was debuted at Winter Park in January and made its national appearance soon after. BTW, New Belgium is now the official craft brewer for Winter Park. I think once craft breweries start becoming the “official brewery” of anything it means they are not really craft in the manner that many of us think.

Slow Ride is definitely a lighter IPA coming in at 4.5% ABV and 40 IBU:

New Belgium Slow Ride IPA

Slow Ride uses Mosaic, a well known hop variety, and Nelson Sauvin, which I had never heard of until visiting New Belgium’s website. It’s a hop grown in New Zealand. A lot of the descriptors sound like “Sideways” wine guy words, but it seems like the main current of description is that it is a fruity hop that imparts white wine like notes. Okay, I’ll bite but it seemed like a pretty standard dry hop profile to me when I drank a couple of bottles. Call me unsophisticated. It won’t hurt my feelings.

Slow RIde comes close to the golden ratio of 1:1 ABV to IBU that I have been fiddling with for a while now. If your beer is 4.5% ABV it should be 45 IBU. It seems to hold true that beers like this are very balanced if the body of the beer can hold up its end of the bargain.

This is where I feel like New Belgium beers have really been falling down lately. The body of the beers has been lacking. You could say the beers are thin, but for a product that is mostly water even in the thickest instances it is not really the most appropriate descriptor. What is lacking is interest. Some beers have it, even if the alcohol and bitterness are not at stratospheric levels, and a lot of other beers do not. This is where true brewing talent shines.

Overall, this is a solid effort and if you want something easy to drink on a warm day that actually tastes like beer grab a pint of Slow Ride:

Two Mug Purchase

Samuel Adams Harvest Collection

Someone should stop me from going to the grocery store without adult supervision.  I stick to the list—one which I made by the way—until the end when I begin wandering the “health market” section where my local grocery puts a lot of the natural or organic products and the liquor store.  For those of you who cannot imagine a full-line liquor store in a grocery store—I am looking at you people in Minnesota—it’s a damn nightmare because so many beer options are just a short stroll away from the produce.

A sampler pack from Samuel Adams got me again.  First it was …? And then it was …?  Now it’s …?  Someone save me from myself.  I think what gets me every time is that these twelve packs contain six different beers, so I am really able to sample some different varieties without much commitment.  That’s it I am a commitment-phobe.  Nailed it!

The six beers in the Harvest Collection sampler were Boston Lager, Ruby Mild, Oktoberfest, Hazel Brown, Latitude 48 IPA, and Harvest Pumpkin Ale.  Enough ink has been spilled about Boston Lager in this blog and every other beer themed outlet to fill several barrels, so I will leave well enough alone.  I usually save the bottles of that beer for visitors less inclined to experiment with a dry-hopped single hop IPA like the most recent creation in bottled in my basement.

Ruby Mild is a nice place to start:

Ruby Mild

The beer is truly mild with a low bitterness (20 IBU) and middling alcohol content (5.6% ABV).  I would be inclined to characterize this beer as an American amber ale, but the description from the brewer puts it more in line with traditional English ales.  The ingredient list supports this classification as it uses hops of European origin and malts more associated with English brews.  Had it been hopped with Cascade or Willamette hops instead of East Kent Goldings the story would have been different.

Nonetheless, it is an enjoyable drinking experience.  European hops tend to be less “in your face” than some of the more well-known American varieties and the flavor profile is a little more mysterious that it lends an air of experimentation when drinking beers hopped in such a way.

Oktoberfest is another European inspired beer:

Oktoberfest

In my neck of the woods when six packs of Oktoberfest inspired beers—particularly the variety from Samuel Adams—hit store shelves several beer drinkers I know stock up for the coming months in the knowledge that it will disappear shortly.

If you read about the beers that are consumed on the Oktoberfest grounds the beers need to conform to three criteria: adhere to the Reinheitsgebot or “Bavarian Purity Law,” have an ABV equal to or greater than 6%, and be brewed within the city limits of Munich.  Obviously, this leaves a lot of room open for interpretation.

Given these criteria, Oktoberfest from Samuel Adams does not qualify.  It’s lower in alcohol (5.3% ABV) and is not brewed within the city limits of Munich.  However, this is America and we are known for not adhering to rules of style.  It’s what makes our beer culture so dynamic.

Regardless, Oktoberfest is an easy drinking fall beer.  It’s almost like the fall equivalent to summer’s lawnmower beers.  It’s easy to sit down by the outdoor firepit on a cool weekend evening and sip a pint as desiccated leaves blow past.

Speaking of fall flavors let’s discuss Hazel Brown:

Hazel Brown

Hazelnuts are one of those holiday delights from my childhood that stick out.  Every year about this time a bowl of mixed nuts in the shell would appear with a couple of nutcrackers on the kitchen table.  After dinner everyone would sit around with a beer or coffee and crack nuts until it was bedtime.  I always loved the delicate flavor of an actual hazelnut.

Too bad everything that is hazelnut flavored loses the delicate part in favor or amped up flavor.  Hazel Brown is no different.  You notice it from the moment that your nose hits the rim of the glass.  It’s like walking into a coffeeshop that is brewing a pot of hazelnut flavored coffee.  It overpowers everything and just sticks to your olfactory receptors.

I was really disappointed because brown ales or nut brown ales are one of the beer styles that I feel has gotten a short straw in the race to produce IPAs of increasing extremity.  Newcastle’s version is one of my formative beer experiences and I have enjoyed brewing examples of brown ales in my basement for a while now.  It’s a great style to brew yourself because it is very forgiving.

Everyone has an IPA nowadays and the Boston Beer Company is no different:

Latitude 48 IPA

In the description of the beer the hops used read like a menu of craft beer hop varieties: Hallertau Mittelfrueh, East Kent Golding, Zeus, Simcoe, Ahtanum, and Mosaic.  The big deal here is the Mosaic variety.  If you believe the hype than this is the next big thing in hops.  Described in different terms as “Citra on steroids” or “Simcoe, only better.”  With such a wide variety of hops included in the beer already I do not know if Mosaic was given a chance to shine on its own.  It seems like it needs to be used in a single hop experiment to really showcase the hop profile.

The other marketing rhetoric with Latitude 48 is that all of the hops are grown near the 48th latitude.  Okay, I’ll bite, why is this a big deal?  I cannot seem to find an answer.

In the end Latitude 48 is like an IPA with training wheels.  It’s okay, but there are literally hundreds of examples of the style that are better.  The beer is supposed to be mid-high in terms of bitterness (60 IBU), but I did not think that it drank anywhere near that which I am attributing to the muddled profile from so many different varieties of hops being used.  Editing is a skill that can be used to produce superior beer.

When the season begins to change pumpkin becomes the flavor of the month.  All right, the whole pumpkin or pumpkin spice flavored hysteria has gotten out of hand because you start to see items appearing at the end of August.  Sorry marketers but August is still very much summer in my neck of the woods.

Nonetheless, pumpkin ales are a big deal for the American brewing community and Samuel Adams has put forth their own example:

Harvest Pumpkin Ale

The first aromas that I noticed were unmistakably pumpkin.  But, it was more like the aroma of pumpkin that is left on your hands after carving a couple of jack-o-lanterns with the kids.

Honestly, I could not get over the aroma as I drank the beer which was really an unremarkable ale save for the pumpkin aroma.  I guess that pumpkin is like bananas for me.  Once I get a whiff, it’s all that I can think of for the duration of the glass.  Granted, I am also the same person that almost gags when I catch the first whiff of a pumpkin spice latte on my infrequent trips to Starbucks when the weather turns cold.

Friday Linkage 3/9/2012

The winter of 2011-12 will go down as the winter that never was in eastern Iowa.  This week, the first full week of March, saw temperatures reach in the mid-60s in Cedar Rapids.  I know there are people out there who do not believe in climate change or global warming or anything that anyone with an education that did not come from a mail order bible college, but the reality is staring us in the face because I had my Chacos on in March.  Comfortably.

At least Rush Limbaugh has proven that he can be such an ass that people will finally start to do something about his behavior.  As of Thursday, 49 sponsors had dropped out of paying the offensive gas bag.  However, nothing can make me laugh quite like seeing this:

Not too worry Rush, it can always get worse.  You could be Rick Santorum.

On to the links…

Rush Claims Solar and Wind Industry do not Exist–I thought Rush was off the Oxycontin, but apparently someone is slipping him some or he is an idiot–your choice–because he is claiming the wind and solar industries are non-existent.  Yep, those turbines and panels just make themselves.  Everything just magically appears on roofs or erects towers.  It is amazing hippie magic.

Neurotoxins in Shark Fins–Not only is the practice barbaric and the product resulting from the barbarism is described as being tasteless gelatin, now there is evidence that you can get a nice dose of BMAA (Beta-methylamino-L-alanine).  BMAA is a neurotoxin that a growing body of evidence ties to Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and A.L.S.  Yep, you can eat shark fin soup all you want but it’s putting you once step closer to a degenerative neurological disorder.  Someone in Hong Kong captured shark fins covering the sidewalk like nude dancer leaflets in Las Vegas.

Rooftop Revolution–The real story in solar electrical generation is not Solyndra or the coming trade fight with the Chinese over dumping.  It’s actually the relentless drive downward in the cost of generating a kilowatt of electricity to a point where grid parity with traditional generation is realized.  At that point mass adoption is merely a formality, dependant upon how fast installers can scale.

Postcard from a Solar Rooftop–Solar Mosaic is trying to bring the wonderful idea of crowd funding to solar installations.  At the People’s Grocery in Oakland some 70 people invested almost $40K to deploy a solar rooftop.  The big trick will be getting the SEC to agree to this finance model because it has a problem with anyone not qualified as an institutional–i.e. deep pocketed–investor participating.  Wonder why?

Renewable Standards have No Statistical Impact on Rates–That’s right, having a standard that says a state must generate a certain percentage of electrcity from renewables has no statistical impact on electricity rates.  Pretty simple.

U.K.’s First Solar Town–Wadebridge, a town in Cornwall, is the first in the U.K. to run a significant percentage of its energy from renewables.  I wonder if this is the kind of thing we need in the U.S.–a town to show that renewables can provide the bulk of a city’s load.

How to Slash Oil Dependence–While the generation of electricity seems to be getting greener all the time the truth remains that our transportation infrastructure is like a crack addict for oil.  The solution to energy resilience–independence is a hokey goal for primary season–is to dramatically reduce our use of oil as a transportation fuel.  Geez, I sound like Jimmy Carter.

Giving up Carbon for Lent–It looks like not all Catholics are of the Rick Santorum variety.  I do not know how one gives up carbon for Lent, but more power to the people for trying.

Pigweed is Coming–Even Roundup is no longer effective against pigweed (Palmer amaranth).  If you have ever had the misfortune of this stuff growing in your yard or garden count your lucky stars.  The only effective way to get rid of the plant is to pull it out and even that is not a guarantee.  With weed resistant superpowers the stuff is sure to become the bane of cotton and soybean farmers.

It’s not Junk Food if I Made It–Michael Pollan has a rule about a junk food: “Eat all the junk food you want as long as you make it.”  It makes since because making this stuff is hard.  Conveinence makes us fat as much as the food makes us fat.  No one would eat the equivalent of a bag of potato chips if made from scratch because almost no one would make potato chips.