Tag Archives: Oregon

Books I Read in 2019…in the Past Nine Months

Thirty eight books down through nine months of the year.  Marching toward fifty.

You can see what I read during the first three months and the second three months of the year.

Reading in the third quarter:

That’s all folks.  I completed my goal of twenty five books.  In hindsight, this seems like a “gimme” goal and, maybe, I should have aimed for something a little more aspirational.  It does seem that merely giving myself an arbitrary goal led to more reading.

The best aspect of this, in my opinion, is that all of these books were borrowed from my local public libraries.  Yes, I said “libraries.”  I am one of those weird people who has a library card for three different library networks in the area—Cedar Rapids Metro Library Network, Iowa City Library, and the University of Iowa Library.

Note: The links to buy the books from Powell’s yield me no benefit.  I would encourage you to find these books at your local library, but if you must buy a book do not buy it from Amazon.

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Books I Read in 2019…in the First Six Months

You can see what I read in the first three months of the year here.

The books that I have read in second three months of the year go like this:

A note on a book that I tried to finish, but gave up on for various reasons:

This book came highly recommended from two sources that I take seriously on what books to read next.  However, I could not finish the book.  Why?  It felt like every chapter, regardless of theme, was there to make the point that the medical establishment had failed Lyme disease patients.  As in the chapter could be about the spread of disease carrying ticks due to climate change but it would segue into a harangue on doctors ignoring Lyme symptoms in a patient in Wisconsin.  The topic is important and timely, but an editor could have tightened the narrative to make it more impactful and readable.  Sometimes you just gotta’ cry “Uncle!”

The best aspect of this, in my opinion, is that all of these books were borrowed from my local public libraries.  Yes, I said “libraries.”  I am one of those weird people who has a library card for three different library networks in the area—Cedar Rapids Metro Library Network, Iowa City Library, and the University of Iowa Library.

I have finished 23 books with just 2 to go until my goal of twenty five.  Maybe I was selling myself a little short in the reading department.

 

Note: The links to buy the books from Powell’s yield me no benefit.  I would encourage you to find these books at your local library, but if you must buy a book do not buy it from Amazon.

Books I Read in 2019…So Far

At the beginning of the year I set a goal to read twenty five books.  Here is what I read in the first three months of the year:

Thirteen down leaves twelve to go.  Twenty five books seems like a light goal, but I have some monster books to finish that will slow down my completion rate.

The best aspect of this, in my opinion, is that all of these books were borrowed from my local public libraries.  Yes, I said “libraries.”  I am one of those weird people who has a library card for three different library networks in the area—Cedar Rapids Metro Library Network, Iowa City Library, and the University of Iowa Library.

Note: The links to buy the books from Powell’s yield me no benefit.  I would encourage you to find these books at your local library, but if you must buy a book do not buy it from Amazon.

Friday Linkage 10/26/2018

It is eleven days until election day.  I will start every post for next eleven days with the same message.

This week has seen a terrorist send pipe bombs to the same people that Donald Trump demonizes via tweets and whatever air time the media will allow him these days.  Coincidence?  I am fairly confident in saying that the odds the terrorist owns a MAGA hat are good.

I understand that it is hyperbole, to some extent, in claiming that this is the most important election in history.  However, I do believe that this may be the most important election in my lifetime.  At least until 2020.

On to the links…

The Most Important Science Policy Issue in Every State—I can almost guarantee you that whatever state you live in that the Republican candidate for national office is on the wrong side of this issue.

The Midterms Have the Power to Usher in an Era of Climate Action—Vote in eleven days to make this a reality.

Why Conservatives Keep Gaslighting the Nation about Climate Change—It is not really a secret.  People care about climate change and want action.  Republicans are bought and paid for by the fossil fuel lobby, so Republicans listen to their paymasters.

By 2035, the ‘Great Fuel Switch’ will Mark the End of the Age of Oil and Gas—The question is not if such a switch will happen, but how do we accelerate the timeline?

Zinke is Latest Trump Cabinet Member to have Abused Travel Privileges—Scandals that would have had Sean Hannity palpitating and salivating at during the Obama years are just another day in D.C. when the cheese puff is in charge.  Imagine what the investigations will be like when Democrats take control of the House of Representatives.

In Response to Trump Administration Efforts, Oregon Moves to Ban Offshore Drilling—What this fight not be about state’s rights, but the power of the federal government to determine oil and gas policy.  Remember, Republicans love state’s rights as long as it is about suppressing the votes of minorities, banning abortion, and generally being shitty to regular people.

14-Year-Long Oil Spill in Gulf of Mexico Verges on Becoming One of the Worst in U.S. History—If someone back up a tractor trailer and dumped 500 barrels of sludge a day into a river that person would go to jail.  However, because this was done by a corporation there is no recourse for the lasting environmental damage.  The next time someone tells you about the great safety and environmental record of America’s gas and oil industry send them this link.

This Is The Deadly Ocean Plastic Pollution You Never Hear About—Ban plastic straws all you want, it is not a bad idea but it is kind of small potatoes, because abandoned fishing nets are a much bigger problem.

US Corporate Renewable Energy Procurement Hits Record Levels—It is hard to comprehend how big many corporations are, but they exert the same influence as most nation states are able to bring to bear.  If these corporations move to renewable energy, it is by default that the countries that they are based in will move to renewable energy.

The True People of the Amazon Help Save the World—Save the forests, save the world.

As Climate Change Worsens, Trees may be the Key to Saving our Future—The geography is different, but the story is the same.  Save the forests, save the world.

The Battle to Curb our Appetite for Concrete—Concrete is an emissions disaster.

Could We Grow All the Food We Need in Our Yards?—It may sound like the premise for a dystopian young adult novel, but the question remains.  Just how much food could we grow in the space occupied by our lawns?

Dig for Victory: 16 Posters from When our Food was Fighting—It is no secret that I love war time homefront posters.  These show you that maybe “victory is in the kitchen” via the garden.

Deschutes Brewery Pinedrops IPA

The second beer that I ended up with because of HyVee’s evil Fuel Saver program was Deschutes Brewery’s Pinedrops IPA:

Pinedrops

This beer pours a lot lighter than Fresh Squeezed IPA. Therefore, I would classify this as a more traditional IPA versus the emerging American Pale Ale style of beer.

However, the light body does not provide a good sounding board for either the alcohol (6.5% ABV) or bitterness (70 IBU). Perhaps it is from the wide variety of hops used— Nugget, Northern Brewer, Chinook, Centennial, and Equinox hops—or the general level of bitterness, but this beer leaves a lingering after taste that is not particularly pleasant.

It reminds me, unfortunately, of a lot of early craft beer IPAs that left you with the feeling of having drank some bong water with your beer. Those brewers were trying to mask deficiencies in skill by piling on flavors and aromas. Having drank well done beers from Deschutes Brewery before I know there is no need for these brewers to be hiding because the talent is present in the brewhouse.

Also, with a name like Pinedrops I was expecting a heavy, resinous profile that almost made you think you were breathing in the air of a temperate coniferous rain forest. Was that too much to ask?

At this stage of the craft brewing industry in America we expect more from our IPAs:

One Mug Homebrew

See what others are saying about Deschutes Brewery Pinedrops IPA at Beeradvocate.

Deschutes Brewery Fresh Squeezed IPA

HyVee’s Fuel Saver program is the devil. You walk into the liquor store thinking you are going to pick up a fifteen pack of All Day IPA and instead you end up with something completely different because you saved $0.25 off per gallon of gas. This is how I ended up with two six-packs of different beers from Deschutes Brewery. In my defense, a total of $0.50 off per gallon of gas ends up saving me $10 when I fill up with the maximum of twenty gallons. Easy to do when road trip summers are here.

When Deschutes Brewery first came into the Iowa market I tried several of their beers and came away liking them in general. It’s been a while and I have not been tempted since for various reasons. The first beer I cracked open was Fresh Squeezed IPA:

Fresh SqueezedI had passed this beer on numerous occasions, read the label, and thought that with a name like Fresh Squeezed it should have been a fresh hopped beer. Damn marketing.

The beer pours a darker amber color than most IPAs, which makes me consider this more of an American Pale Ale. What does that mean? Whatever marketing wants it to mean, but in general I think it means more malt and body than a traditional IPA.

All of this extra body means that the beer drinks a lot easier than its 6.4% ABV and 60 IBU would suggest. Being near the golden ratio—in my opinion—of ABV to IBU the extra body of the beer hides some of the downsides of having more bitterness and bite. It essentially mellows out the more extreme elements of the alcohol and hops.  Fresh Squeezed is brewed with a combination of Citra, Mosaic, and Nugget hops. None of these really stand out as the driving element leaving the profile a little muddled or muted. Again, I was kind of bummed that this was not a fresh hopped beer.

In summary, you can do a lot worse in terms of mainstream pale ales and you ought to give Fresh Squeezed a try if you are looking to broaden your pale ale palate:

Two Mug PurchaseSee what others are saying about Deschutes Brewery Fresh Squeezed IPA at Beeradvocate.

Taking a Trip Down Deschutes

Here’s the thing about the craft beer “scene” in the United States in 2013.  You can walk into any moderately curated beer section, even grocery stores with well-run liquor departments, and find really good beers that you had not heard of until that day.

Take Deschutes Brewery out of Bend, Oregon.  Until I walked into HyVee and saw a monster display of six-packs I had never heard of the brewery that I could remember.  Beer festivals do not count because by hour three of samples a lot of the breweries begin to meld into one amorphous picture due to the quantity of breweries and brews.

I took a flyer on four six-packs because I hate friends coming over and my latest two batches of homebrew—a Lefse Blonde and Fat Tire clone—are not done bottle conditioning.  It also helped that the six-packs were a manager’s special for the Fuel Saver program.  Each six-pack got me 10 cents off per gallon at my next fill up.  Yeah, I got marketed.

Started in 1988, so this is the twenty fifth year of brewing, Deschutes Brewery is actually one of the major players in the craft beer scene.  According to some estimates it is the fifth largest craft brewer and the eleventh largest brewery in the U.S.  Okay, my source was Wikipedia.  Busted.

I walked out of the store with a six-pack of Chainbreaker White IPA, Twilight Summer Ale, Mirror Pond Pale Ale, and Black Butte Porter.  Let’s talk about them in that order starting with the Chainbreaker White IPA:

Chainbreaker White IPA

First off, I am a sucker for any beer that references bicycles.  It’s something in the DNA of anyone who spends a lot of time on a bike that they will also probably love beer.  Spend some time around the moving carnival that is RAGBRAI and you will understand that there is some connection.  Thousands of people on bikes in the height of an Iowa summer fueled on little more than fried food and cold beer.  I digress.

In general white or wit beers are not synonymous with the characteristics on an India Pale Ale (IPA).  The white beers are known for clean profiles and citrus/spice notes while an IPA is known for body and hops.  Mixing the two styles is a really interesting idea that works pretty well.  I would have classified this beer as a hopped up white beer rather than an IPA, as the name indicates, because the body of the beer just screams white ale.  Even though there are some pretty strong hop aromas and flavors, the light body does not allow them to linger very long so the effect is somewhat transitory.  For that reason the beer drinks a lot lighter than its alcohol (5.6% ABV) and bitterness (55 IBU) might suggest.

Chainbreaker White uses four different hop varieties, but the one that has me the most intrigued is Citra.  This particular variety has been showing up in a lot of craft beers and homebrews.  The last two times I have tried to order recipe kits using the hop it has been backordered.  A trip north to Minneapolis may be required so that I can get my hands on some to experiment.

Twilight Summer Ale is also a kind of hybrid:

Twilight Summer Ale

Craft beers brewed for the summer season are truly something that is very welcome.  At the start of the craft beer renaissance, it was like people expected you to drink heavily hopped and malted beers even in the heat of a Midwestern summer.  Sorry guys, but something lighter is appreciated.  Over the past few years brewmasters have really obliged our summer palates.

If Chainbreaker White IPA had an ensemble cast of hops than I guess Twilight Summer Ale is working from the Robert Altman script by including Northern Brewer, Amarillo, Cascade, Tettnang, and Brambling Cross.  Even though it is only one of the five varieties used, you can really taste the inclusion of Amarillo.  Like Simcoe, Amarillo is a variety whose flavor and aroma can cut through even the heaviest hand elsewhere in the brew.  At times this can be a detriment to the beer because it overwhelms subtler notes, but not with Twilight Summer Ale.  The inclusion of Amarillo brings hop aroma and flavor to the beer without imparting too much bitterness and making you feel like there is a Lucky Strike stuck in the back of your throat.

Surprisingly, Mirror Pond Pale Ale does the opposite of Chainbreaker White IPA and Twilight Summer Ale:

Mirror Pond Pale Ale

This beer drinks heavier than its alcohol (5% ABV) and bitterness (40 IBU) suggests.  If you put both Chainbreaker White and Mirror Pond in paper bags to sample I am sure that most people would point to Mirror Pond as the “heavier” beer.

Maybe it is on account of Mirror Pond relying solely on Cascade hops rather than a mix of four hop varieties.  I have found that single hop beers tend to really accentuate the “hoppiness” of that particular variety in a manner that is outsized compared to its stated bitterness.  It is like the undercurrents in aroma and flavor that might get lost in an ensemble shine through like a saxophone solo.

The other culprit is probably the malt.  Pale malt is heavier in body than either pilsner or wheat malt so Mirror Pond is going to have a heavier body, which may confuse the palate as to which beer is bringing the hops to the party.

Nonetheless, Mirror Pond is a very successful take on the classic American Pacific Northwest pale ale.  This style of beer, along with amber ale, are the standard bearers for the American craft beer renaissance.

Black Butte Porter is not a summer beer:

Black Butte Porter

Obviously, as a porter this is a dark beer.  It is also a heavy beer, more so than its alcohol (5.2% ABV) and bitterness (30 IBU) would dictate.  It is nice to see a porter not be overly bitter because it allows for the roasted and chocolate flavors of the malt to really shine.  I think a lot of porters and stouts are given a healthy dose of hops to mask the bitter flavors from roasted malts.  It takes a deft and delicate hand to get the right amount of flavor from roasted malts without making the beer reminiscent of burnt marshmallows around the campfire.

What is really nice about moderately bitter porters is that the beers are allowed to be creamy and even “bready.”  It’s an odd adjective “bready,” but I think that it describes the near chewiness from heavy bodied beers that do have a correspondingly heavy bitterness.  Maybe there is a reason a lot of beer champions refer to the product as “liquid bread.”

It is fairly obvious from my comments above that I came away impressed with the work that Deschutes Brewery is doing.  As the fifth largest craft brewer in the United States, it’s also apparent that a lot of other beer drinkers are thinking the same thing.  Go out and give them a try.