Tag Archives: Leaf

April 2020 Solar PV Production…the Most Ever

My solar photovoltaic array’s production for April 2020 was the most my system has ever produced:

April 2020 solar

All right, this is less a function of any solar intensity and more a result of my adding an additional eight panels to my array at the end of 2019.  Nevertheless, over 840 kWh of clean, green electricity is a nice month.

The story gets better.  The delta between my system’s production and consumption was 396 kWh “in the black” meaning my home was better than net zero.  It was net positive electricity for the month of April.  I still have to do something about my home’s natural gas fired water heater and furnace.  Coronavirus has kind of put a dampener on any major purchases for the moment.

As expected, we did not drive very much at all this month.  I took the Nissan Leaf out for 115.0 miles at an average efficiency of 5.7 miles per kWh.  This represents 20.2 kWh of energy usage and a carbon emissions savings of ~133 lbs versus driving my truck assuming that all of my electricity was pulled from the grid.  Which, as I noted above, my household was quite positive this month when it came to electricity production.

Those 115 miles represent almost all of the driving for my entire household for the month of April save for a couple of trips in our ICE vehicles that we took to keep the fluids moving.  After this “adventure” we might consider paring down our personal vehicle fleet.

What is crazy about this whole not driving thing is the cumulative impact of not driving.  As of today my wife and I have worked from home for 31 work days.  Using an average miles per day of 22 we have avoided driving ~1,364 miles between the both of us just by not going to work.

Decarbonizing Transportation Due to Coronavirus

Like almost everyone else in the United States, my family has been hunkered down at home since mid-March due to concerns about spreading coronavirus.  This has meant a cessation of all my children’s activities like dance and soccer.  Therefore, it has also meant cancelled trips for dance competitions and soccer tournaments.

Furthermore, my wife and I have been working from home since returning from an aborted ski trip to Winter Park, Colorado.  There is nothing quite like the ski resort effectively closing for the season a mere two hours after you arrive in town.  It is a real kick in the groin to have to go up and over the Berthoud Pass twice in thirty-six hours.

All of this has already added up to seventeen days of working from home, so two cars have been practically parked for that same time period.  Just my driving alone for those seventeen days would equal more than 350 miles of driving my Nissan Leaf not counting any additional mileage for grocery shopping or shuttling kids.  This demand for transportation has not been shifted.  It has been destroyed.

Along with the demand destruction for transportation is a corresponding drop in carbon emissions as a matter of course.  The dramatically altered commuting habits of Americans and others across the globe have decarbonized our transportation.  It’s not permanent, but it does show that a radically different future is possible.

One of my goals for 2020 was to replace 500 miles of car-centric transportation with human powered transit.  I had hoped to start commuting one or two days a week via bicycle to my job, but coronavirus has had other ideas about how things are going to develop this year.

While I have not been replacing car miles with bicycle miles I have watched the number of miles driven drop precipitously.  For example, during the first two weeks of April I have driven my Nissan Leaf less than 60 miles which includes all of my household’s car transportation to do things like pick up groceries.  Sixty miles is what I would generally average across less than three days during normal conditions.  I guess all of the kilowatt hours from my solar array are going to get shunted onto the grid for someone else to enjoy.  Each day of no car travel in my Leaf is like putting 4 kWh onto the grid for someone else to use.  Maybe it will displace just a little bit of coal.

The upside to this whole shit sandwich of coronavirus, specifically, and 2020, generally, is that we are witness to a different possibility for the future that is a departure from our current path without being dependent upon radical technological change.

The sky is blue because we just stopped driving.

March 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

My solar monitoring platform was available for an entire month and all of the panels on my solar system were fully functional.  This led to a pretty good March for solar production:

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Just under 578 kWh for the month.  This compares with ~316 kWh in 2019 and ~424 kWh in 2018 or an increase of ~83% and ~36% over each of those years respectively.  My guess is that the average year-over-year production increase will fall somewhere in the middle of those two on average over the course of the next year.  Only time will tell.

For the month, my household ended up “net positive” ~67 kWh.  My household was also “net positive” in March.  It is my assumption that the next couple of months will be big “net positive” months in terms of electricity consumption versus production since the period before the hot summer months is generally light on consumption.

One factor driving a lower level of electricity consumption is the fact that we are not driving much, if at all, as a household due to COVID-19.  All of my children’s activities have been cancelled and we are working from home.  I cannot remember if I have charged my Nissan Leaf in the two weeks we have been home from an aborted spring ski trip to Colorado.

For the month, I drove my Nissan Leaf ~652 miles at an average efficiency of 5.3 miles per kWh.  Almost all of those miles were in the two weeks before we locked down at home.  I “saved” ~746 pounds of carbon dioxide emissions compared to driving my truck assuming that I pulled all of the electricity from the grid at my utility’s average carbon intensity.  In the first quarter I have “saved” ~2,785 ponds of carbon dioxide emissions.  Given that I am now producing more electricity via my solar panels than my household is consuming, including EV charging, those carbon dioxide savings are even greater.  The same logic goes for the fuel cost savings.

April is going to be a weird month for sure.

February 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

The monitoring platform for my expanded photovoltaic array is back online:

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It was only turned on for the last few days of the month, so I do not know how the system performed for the entirety of February.  However, in just four days the system recorded more production than the entire month of February last year.  Granted, the array was under ten inches or more of snow for most of that time last year.

Overall, I ended up nearly even in terms of production versus consumption.  The actual number was approximately 4 kWh “ahead.”  I am figuring that I will end up “ahead” of consumption for most months here on out until January rolls around again.

The crazy thing was that if I had driven a normal amount this month I would have been even more in the black.  Due to a work commitment out of town for an entire week I drove approximately 50% more miles per day on average in the month of February.  Those highway miles added up to a lot of extra driving at a not so efficient clip.

For the month of February I drove ~973 miles at an average efficiency of 4.6 miles per kilowatt hour.  That driving used ~212 kWh of electricity and saved ~1,086 pounds of CO2 being emitted, assuming all electricity was pulled from the grid at an average carbon intensity for my region of the country, versus if those same miles were driven in my truck.

January 2020 Solar Production and EV Efficiency

Okay, January kind of sucks if you are living the electrified life.  On average, January and/or February are the worst months for solar production and EV efficiency.  Why?

For my solar photovoltaic array the answer is in two parts: snow and clouds.  For part of the month, it is common for my panels to be covered with snow.  I have tried my best to knock the snow free with a foam roof rake, but this is really just scratching at the surface of the problem.

The second part of the problem is that the month of January is just not that sunny in eastern Iowa.  The sun came out on Saturday and everyone in the house sort of looked surprised.  It was a “Do you remember the last time you saw the sun” kind of moment.

The end result is that you do not make very much electricity.  For the month I am unsure of just how much my PV array produced because my monitoring setup is still not reporting correctly.  Needless to say, I know that I was in the hole ~400 kWh for the month.  Ugh.

The cold weather will also bit you on the rear end when you are driving an EV.  Granted, the cold weather will also impact the efficiency and performance of an ICE vehicle as well.

When you turn on the heat you watch your range and efficiency go into the tank.  On my 2015 Nissan Leaf which uses a resistive heater I can see the “guess o’ meter’s” range drop by at least 30% and more like 40% usually.

If it gets cold enough the “guess o’ meter” will also show less range because the batteries are chilly and cannot discharge as well.

To add insult to injury, regenerative braking is not as effective in the cold weather so more energy is lost to heat in the form of actually using the brake pedal.

However, given all of that downside I still managed to drive 850.5 miles at an average efficiency of 4.7 miles per kilowatt hour.  This compares with the same period last year where I averaged just 3.6 miles per kWh.  I chalk that up to the weather not being quite as harsh and me understanding how to wring more mileage out of my little Nissan Leaf.

For the month I saved ~953 pounds of CO2 from being emitted versus my prior vehicle assuming an average carbon intensity of electricity from the grid.

Like most people in eastern Iowa I am kind of excited to see February be here because it means an end to the ceaseless political ads and a potential break toward more electrified living amenable weather.

Final Report on 2019 “Resolutions”

It is time to take stock of my so-called New Year’s resolutions for 2019 and see how I did.

Without further ado, here is the list:

  • Decarbonize transportation—My 2015 Nissan Leaf has been in the garage for about a year.  Over that time ~7,987 miles at an average efficiency of 5.2 miles per kWh. The Leaf saved ~9,119 pounds of CO2 being emitted compared to my prior vehicle.  Furthermore, I added ~62% generating capacity to my home’s solar photovoltaic array so for 2020 I should be driving on sunshine 100% of the time.
  • No more Amazon—A little bit of failure and a little bit of success. I definitely spent a lot less money at Amazon than in prior years, but it speaks to the company’s ubiquity that I ended up buying anything at all.  Want to buy that odd little gadget?  Guess what, Amazon is about the only place to find fulfillment.
  • No more Walmart—A little more success as I the only trips to Walmart were few and far between for the year. Over the course of the entire holiday shopping season it never entered into my mind to even shop there.  Once a store is no longer part of your “consideration set” that has to be considered a success.
  • Read twenty five books—51 books read.
  • Drink local—Pretty good, but I think I can do better in 2020.
  • Declutter my house—Fail. My family and I spent some time getting rid of old clothes and other stuff that was taking up space in our closets.  However, it feels like we replaced whatever we got rid of over the course of the year.  I know that I will never be a fervent follower of Marie Kondo’s methods nor will I ever embrace modern minimalism.  I thought I could do a little better.
  • Replace existing toilets with low volume flush models—One toilet was replaced. A second toilet is scheduled to be replaced in January.  The third toilet in the house does not get enough use to merit replacement at this time.
  • Plant at least five trees—Two Norway spruce trees are in the ground.  Three Colorado blue spruce trees in the ground. Mission accomplished.
  • Reduce lawn coverage—Fail. I had the best of intentions to start replacing some of my lawn with mixed plantings and landscaped beds.  While I got the trees in the ground the rest of the plan did not come together.  This is where I am going to focus my 2020 landscaping efforts.
  • Ride 2,500 miles on gravel roads—Over 3,000 miles ridden on the year. Mission accomplished.

 

For 2020 I am going to try and build on what was done in 2019.  The goal is to improve each year.  Different goals or different metrics, but the overall theme is improvement.

Stay tuned!

November 2019 Solar PV and Nissan Leaf EV Performance

November was an ugly month for solar photovoltaic production:

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Why?  My system was disconnected and shut down due to a planned upgrade.  The guys from Moxie Solar installed an additional 8 panels and the attendant “balance of system” components like a new grid tie inverter.  The 8 additional panels represent an approximate 62% increase in nameplate capacity for my system.  Given the orientation and installation location are virtually the same as the previous 16 panels I expect to see an approximate 62% increase in solar production once the array is powered up.

This has to be one of the most frustrating parts of a solar installation.  The rooftop install and other system components were done in a little more than a working day.  The city inspection was done in about fifteen minutes and done a few days after installation.  The permission to operate and the simple act of flipping the switch?  I am still waiting.

See most of those zero production days in the last week of November?  That is the cost of waiting for someone to come over from the electric utility and watch a person from the solar installer flip a switch.   It is like a bad anecdote about union rules from the 1980s.  Soon…the switch will be flipped soon.

This might also be the last month for a while where I seen an average of over 5 miles per kilowatt hour in my Nissan Leaf.  For the month I drove a total of 619 miles that used 123.8 kWh of electricity at an average efficiency of 5.0 miles per kWh.  At an average carbon intensity, I avoided emitting ~702 pounds of CO2.

What November really taught me is that cold weather kind of sucks for an EV.  My particular Nissan Leaf is not equipped with the heat pump, so it relies on a resistive heater to provide any level of defrost in cold weather.  Most of the time my trips are short enough that I just deal with a cold cabin while the heated seat and steering wheel keep me cozy.  Put three passengers in the car and the windows start to fog up pretty quick with hot breath.  There is nothing so dispiriting as watching the guess-o-meter drop by 30% or more when you turn on the heat.

It is not enough to dissuade me from recommending an EV in general or an older Nissan Leaf in particular.  There is something to be said for taking advantage of a market dynamic like extreme depreciation.  You can have your Tesla Model 3.  I will take my solar panels, Nissan Leaf, and decarbonized home to the bank every day.