Friday Linkage 7/25/2014

It seems like the world is falling apart or maybe we were just living through a period where the time until doomsday was much further out. I do not know, but it sure feels like things have gotten really crazy in the last couple of months.

On to the links…

National Park Service Calls Development Plans a Threat to Grand Canyon—Seriously, why can we not leave the Grand Canyon alone? First, it’s damning the Colorado River and next it’s uranium mining and then it’s airplane tours that are supremely annoying. And on it goes…

Obama Administration Opens Eastern Seaboard To Oil Drilling Surveys—This was a total WTF moment. Isn’t enough of the U.S. open to oil and gas exploration already? Aren’t oil and gas companies sitting on millions of acres of leases? Confusing.

Despite Foot-Draggers in Congress, Wind Turbine Company Adding 800 Jobs to Colorado Manufacturing—Everything is in spite of Congress these days, but as the price to deploy wind equals the price to produce electricity from coal there will be no requirement for Congress to act. The market will have decided.

Iowa Governor Accused Of Passing Up $1 Million For New Solar—If all politics is local, I guess that my local clown is Terry Branstad who is the biggest shill for industry in state politics right now. Never mind the hush money paid to people that were fired or his inability to follow basic traffic laws, Governor “Brain Dead” is a joke when it comes to moving the state forward.

States Against E.P.A. Rule on Carbon Pollution Would Gain—Too bad certain politicians’ objections to anything done by the Obama administration is driven by politics and optics as opposed to reality. The benefit to a state’s citizens is irrelevant if there is hay to be made on Fox News.

Texas Is Wired for Wind Power, and More Farms Plug In—Texas actually took a proactive approach to building an infrastructure to exploit wind power and it is paying off. Hard to believe in a state that is run by a clown like Rick Perry that something this visionary was undertaken.

China’s Energy Plans Will Worsen Climate Change—Is there ever any good news from China lately? At least this is not the start of the zombie apocalypse.

Tall Wood is the Next Big Thing in Construction—There have been reports that so called “tall wood” will take off as construction costs with more traditional steel and concrete rise due to global demand and climate concerns, but I am not holding my breath given the power of vested interests.

California’s Next Oil Rush might be Surprisingly Delicious—As California confronts the reality of a drier future it’s water intensive agriculture is going to need to look at other crops if it expects to be in the business for any period of time. Almonds and alfalfa are going to be out and olives might just be in.

California Couple Tries To Conserve Water, Ends Up Facing $500 Fine For Brown Lawn—Never mind the drought and the state asking for people to conserve water, if the HOA or city demands a green lawn in the desert it must be done.

How Morro Bay Went from a National Disaster to a Sustainable Success Story—It is possible, even in California, to have a success story.

Cargill to Phase Out use of Growth-Promoting Antibiotics in Turkeys—The elimination of antibiotics as a growth promotion agent is one of the simplest reforms that can be undertaken to check the spread of antibiotic resistant bacteria. An extra pound or so on a turkey carcass is not worth one life lost to a drug-resistant bacterial infection.

Eat Invasive Species!—Invasivore.org is a site dedicated to spreading the know how and culinary skills necessary to make delectable delights from your local invasive species. Asian carp anyone?

Soylent Survivor: One Month Living on Lab-made Liquid Nourishment—It’s hard to believe how much mileage the creator of this meal replacement has gotten. If it had been named Slim-Fast does anyone think that the media would have paid this much attention? Nope.

Why Don’t Ice Cream Sandwiches Melt Anymore?—The obvious answer is that the white stuff in the middle is not actually ice cream. Still, I am a little frightened by the chemical concoction that is being passed off as ice cream. Another reason for homemade.

Faux Craft: Colorado Native Lager

What is craft beer? This is a question that is vexing the industry as formerly small batch brewers grow and expand or big brewers make moves into the craft market via mergers, acquisitions, and brand extensions.

Take Blue Moon for example. To most people who occasionally drink beer it is a craft beer. It is not carrying the label of any of the big three—Miller, Coors, or Budweiser—and it is a style of beer that differs dramatically from your typical light American lager. However, for its entire life Blue Moon has been brewed under the aegis of Coors.

Colorado Native Lager is another product, like Blue Moon, that is brewed by a subsidiary under the aegis of Coors. This time it is brewed by the AC Golden Brewing Company—AC for Adolph Coors perhaps—which operates a brewhouse within the larger Coors complex in Golden—hence the Golden in the name.

The marketing gimmick is excellent. It is brewed only with ingredients from Colorado and it is available only in Colorado. Sort of creates the same mystique that Coors had in the 1970s when people would make road trips to the Centennial State in order to bring back a trunk load of the banquet beer. Can you imagine someone doing that now? We would think they were insane.

So, how does the beer stack up:

Colorado Native

First off, I am less and less of a lager fan every day. Some people will claim that the lager style is simpler and that the lack of any overtones from the yeast allows the hops to shine through. I get none of that with lagers. The aroma that gets me is burnt or off in some similar way that I cannot place.

Second, this beer is sweet. Not cider sweet or Smirnoff Ice sweet, but sweet like a shandy without the lemon hit to balance the sweetness somewhat. There is no sugar in the ingredient list, but I would not be surprised if some honey from the San Luis Valley made its way into the fermentation vessel.

Third, for a beer that claims in its hop bill to have Chinook, Centennial, and Cascade there is very little discernible hop flavor or aroma. It is very muddled. Generally, Chinook is a very distinctive hop—especially when used for dry hopping—and the other two hops are distinctive craft brewing staples.

Last, it comes in those silly cans like Coors Light that have a slightly different geometry than any other twelve ounce can in the world. Why is this a pain? Try combining a twelve pack of disparate cans and discovering that some of the cans are just a little taller. God damn it.

Overall, the gimmick of being made in Colorado from Colorado ingredients and available only in Colorado can take the beer just a little bit beyond failure:

Purchased One Mug Rating

In the past I have been harsh to other “faux craft” beers because I think there is something much more to being craft than purely size. It’s an ethos that is separate from the mega breweries that gave us pale liquid sold more by girls in bikinis than the quality of the drinking experience.

Colorado Feels like the Future

This is not some screed where I quote from Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged. For those of you who have not tortured yourself by actually attempting to read that magnum opus of conservative crap hole rhetoric, Colorado plays a major thematic role. Instead this is my thoughts about how Colorado seems to be moving toward a vision of what I think the United States will increasingly look like in the coming decades.

As I spent more than a week in the Centennial State I began to formulate some thoughts. Here goes:

In terms of politics, the state is polarized. Outside of Denver metroplex that stretches to the north to include the liberal paradise of Boulder, the state is relatively conservative. However, population trends and other demographic forces do not favor the continued strong influence of constituencies outside of the more progressive Denver metroplex. Sure, conservatives and libertarians will make a lot of noise—witness the recent tomfoolery about secession in the northern part of the state—but those voices will increasingly lack electoral heft save for the most gerrymandered of districts. Don’t believe me? Look at Representative Steve King of Iowa. He’s the Republican douche who prattled on about immigrants being drug mules and what not. Real class act. Earlier this month he held a “rally” in his district and this was the turnout:

Steve-king-hate-rally-2

Oh yeah. So, while hateful views and rhetoric like the sewage being spilled from Rep. King’s mouth may play well of Fox News—which has a demographic problem itself as it’s average viewer is easily old enough to receive full Social Security benefits—it is increasingly not something most people want to hear. Remember, Steve King is from a district in a state that gave then-candidate Barack Obama his push to the national stage with a stunning caucus win and twice voted for the man to become President. This is also a state that has allowed gay marriage since 2009 and has not imploded in some biblical event. This is what the future looks like for the right if increasingly exclusionary voices are the only ones to get heard.

The state’s left leaning politics, combined with a libertarian bent towards personal liberty, have already pushed forward one of the most progressive agenda items in the United States…the legalization of recreational marijuana for adults. Imagine that the U.S. police and prison industrial complex were no longer calling the shots in support of a broken system that enriches those exact entities at the expense of the greater nation. Imagine a cessation to the incessant drug war that has consumed U.S. society for the better part of forty years. I saw this future in Colorado where an adult can walk into a shop and buy weed as if it were no more prohibited than alcohol. Amazing.

Colorado’s prominence in the pantheon of craft beer is unquestionable and I am an unabashed fan of many of the breweries that call the state home. More so these breweries represent a more local and human scale future to the production of the foodstuffs that we consume. For anyone who does not believe that smaller scale producers can survive in a broader industrial context I would point you to the thriving craft beer industry in general and those breweries in Colorado in particular. Why do I believe that these examples of small scale success bode well for other endeavors into more localized and human scale production that is better for our bodies, souls, and planet? It is harder to think of an industry with more entrenched giants than beer—the formerly big three of Budweiser, Miller, and Coors—who over time erected a gauntlet of barriers to entry in an effort to create a moat around the market for beer in the United States. Guess what? The only segment of the beer industry that is growing is craft beer and it has a long way to go.

The state is also dealing with the nasty effects of climate change in real time. While the impacts of climate change might be theoretical for other states it is already rearing its ugly head in Colorado. Drive through any national forest in the state and you will see acre upon acre of dead timber that was killed by a beetle normally held in check by cold winters and healthy trees. The increasingly warmer winters and unreliable snow are forcing the vibrant ski tourism industry to evaluate a future where there might not be so many days where people are willing to shell out big bucks for lift tickets. If you think that this is just about the high Rockies you would be mistaken. In Colorado Springs the community has dealt with massive wildfires, exacerbated by unreliable rainfall, and the subsequent problems of flooding when rains finally soak denuded hillsides. Many communities along the Front Range were devastated last year when 1,000 year floods—whatever that means in a climate change reality—inundated communities at the base of the mountains.

There are other things that I saw when I was driving that made me think maybe, just maybe there is hope in our future if Colorado is the guide. It’s not a comprehensive network and it bypasses some communities, but the efforts to bring light rail across the Denver area are laudable. Soon, a light rail extension will finally link the airport—which is in bumblefuck relative to downtown—and the city of Denver. It’s still a place ruled by the car, but stand still long enough and you will likely be mowed down by someone riding a bike.

Get a chance to drive around and you will start to notice solar panels everywhere. If you start at the airport there are fields of them near the road leading to the parking structures. From there you will see solar panels on top of houses and on commercial buildings. Heck, right off I-25 in the heart of deep red El Paso County—where they renamed the freeway the Ronald Reagan Highway or some such shit—there is a big array. Solar gardens sell out in no time flat and you see installer trucks driving all over the place.

I am rambling a bit, but I wanted to get these thoughts out there soon after my return from Colorado. What do you think?

Left Hand Brewing Company Returns to Iowa!

Recently, it was announced that Left Hand Brewing Company will be returning to Iowa after having left the state in 2011:

2014-Iowa-Rollout-Coming-Soon-Social-Media-Square

Check out the announcement here.

It is most excellent to see a great craft brewer expanding to the state and I am hopeful that Left Hand’s partner–Johnson Brothers Liquor Company–complete a successful roll out.

Now, if someone would just get the cajones to bring some more brewers into the state.  You know…like maybe Oskar Blues or Great Divide or Bent Paddle or Surly or…

Oskar Blues Dale’s Pale Ale

For every person a vacation is a time to do something deeply personal. For me it means that I can drink beers that are unavailable to me at home and bring back serious quantities of beer to share with my equally thirsty friends in eastern Iowa. Since I was not flying out to Colorado for this vacation it meant that the back end of the Subaru would be free to haul back many cans of the state’s finest craft brews.

If one beer defined my most recent trip it would be Oskar Blues Dale’s Pale Ale:

Dales Pale Ale

Oskar Blues is a brewery known for making hoppy beers. Dale’s Pale Ale would probably be considered in the middle of the range and is the one variety from the brewery that you see on tap all over Steamboat Springs. Trust me; I drank my fair share of pints at various dinner spots.

Clocking in at 6.5% ABV and 65 IBU Dale’s Pale Ale is a very balanced beer. Notice the synergy between ABV and IBU? Yeah, I am beginning to think that is a thing. Even at those numbers a Dale’s was an easy beer to down and crack another while looking at the glory of summer mountains.

In my humble opinion, Dale’s Pale Ale represents the hallmarks of a Colorado craft beer. You can try beers from a dozen other craft breweries in the state and keep coming back to style notes that were hit with near perfection in a can of Dale’s. Even better is that the difference between the beer you get in a can and what comes out of a tap is not that different, which is saying something in a craft beer world where packaged products for off-site consumption often suffer compared to kegged beer.

It comes in cans which means that you can enjoy a Dale’s in many places a bottle, bomber, or growler just can’t go. Like to the hot tub after a day of hiking when your feet are barking because you only brought a pair of Chacos. Whoops.

Some beers just seem to taste like the place that you find yourself drinking them:

Purchase 4 Mug Rating

Friday Linkage 7/11/2014

It’s off to Colorado for a week of being out of touch, visiting some new breweries, and generally trying to recharge to ol’ batteries. Thus, I will be out of pocket and not posting for more than a week but I should have some good stuff to share come the end of the month like a rundown of some really good beers made in Minnesota that I picked up during my trip over the fourth of July and whatever I end up discovering in the Centennial State.

On to the links…

Investment In Clean Energy At Highest Point Since 2012—Just some plain ol’ good news.

The Emerging Clean Energy Edge—Carl Pope, the former director of the Sierra Club, has a succinct piece on why clean energy has reached the tipping point where it can displace traditional fossil fuels without the need for subsidies. Dig it.

Renewable Energy Provided One-Third Of Germany’s Power In The First Half Of 2014—Don’t believe it is possible to see large scale usage and integration of renewables? Witness Germany getting one third of its power from renewables for an entire half of a year. Not a day. Not a holiday. Rather, an entire half year. Pretty impressive.

‘Singlet Fission’ can Increase Solar Cell Efficiency by as much as 30 Percent—I do not understand the science behind the breakthrough, but anything that can increase the efficiency of solar PV is a good thing.

Taking Oil Industry Cue, Environmentalists Drew Emissions Blueprint—I love that people are surprised by the environmental movement taking cues from the oil and gas lobby. Really? Those companies have been wildly successful in shaping public policy for the better part of a century. It’s about damn time.

Nine Iowa Counties see Million-Gallon Crude Oil Trains—My neck of the woods is not on the list, but these rolling firebombs waiting to happen are rumbling through a good portion of the state. It feels a little too close to home.

To Improve Accuracy, BBC Tells Its Reporters To Stop Giving Air Time To Climate Deniers—Finally, a news corporation takes a stand on giving climate deniers equal time. Why do people who are outnumbered at least 99 to 1 if not 999 to 1 get anywhere close to equal time on the air? Besides Fox News, the BBC’s practice should be standard for every other news outlet. Who cares what Rush says about your bias because he is a blowhard bought and paid for by the extreme right.

This Train Could Power A Fleet Of Electric Buses—Trying to wring out every last wasted kilowatt of electricity is a surer climate change mitigation strategy than any expansion of renewables in terms of immediate return on investment. Innovative solutions like this are going to be part of the future plan.

Californians Keep Up With Joneses’ Water Use—This is depressing. California is facing epic drought and its citizens are doing little if anything to conserve water on a personal level. Who needs a freakin’ green lawn in California? No one.

Protecting Parrotfish on the Path to a Caribbean Reef Revival—Reefs are complete ecosystems, so we need to ensure the vitality of all the creatures that inhabit them. The decline of parrotfish means that algae and other organisms colonize the coral and outcompete more traditional reef inhabitants.

Interior Commits to Bison Restoration, but Offers few Specifics—The North American bison is an amazing creature and its restoration from near extinction is also equally amazing. What is needed, as the Poppers postulate in their Buffalo Commons idea, is a wide scale reintroduction into the landscape of the American west that has been long dominated by cattle.

What Type of Environmentalist are You?—This little quiz made the rounds of the internet during this week. It’s a fun little diversion.

More And More Companies Are Buying Their Way Overseas To Get Lower Taxes—Do you want to know why we have a revenue problem in the U.S.? It’s because corporations keep making more money and keep paying less in taxes. ‘Nuff said.

Bent Paddle Brewing in the House

During my recent trip to the Twin Cities over the July 4th holiday I got a chance to stop at the excellent Four Firkins in St. Louis Park. If you get a chance and you love beer then a trip to this beer lover’s nirvana is a must. The store is chock-a-block full of beers from around the world, but of particular interest to me were the Minnesota made beers that I do not have access to just a few hours south in Iowa.

Bent Paddle Brewing has intrigued me for months. The word coming out of people who had visited Duluth, Minnesota was that this small brewery—along with other breweries in the area—was producing great beer. Founded just over a year ago in May 2013, Bent Paddle Brewing’s reputation has grown steadily making me a thirsty guy.

True to their backcountry paddling—i.e. canoeing for those who did not grow up with visions of the BWCA in their heads—ethos the beer from Bent Paddle Brewing comes in cans. Why? Cans are lighter than bottles, do not shatter, and in most places bottles are not allowed because of the risk of glass breakage. Plus, cans crush down nice and easy for transport back to civilization. Leave only footprints, right?

I ended up with three beers from Bent Paddle: Venture Pils Pislener Lager, Bent Hop Golden IPA, and Paddle Break Blonde. I am going to take these beers in that order starting with Venture Pils:

Bent Paddle Pilsner Lager

I am going to go out on a limb here and say that I am done with pilsner lagers. As a style of beer I find that the difference between a well-executed version and Natural Light is getting surprisingly slim. I also find the style to be sorely lacking in anything approaching interest. All of the beers seem to taste the same and that flavor brings me right back to high school or my first couple years of college when sucking down Busch Light was considered the height of a weekend’s entertainment. Oh how times have changed.

This is not to say that Venture Pils is a “bad beer” in any way shape or form, but if I am going to go out of my way to get a craft beer from a different brewery I want something with a little more originality than a pilsner lager. That being said, someone could pick a six-pack of Venture Pils and be very happy that this was the beer they were drinking beside the water while their friends are crushing Coors Light.

Overall, I am going to say that it is middle of the road and built not to offend:

Two Mug Purchase

Bent Hop Golden IPA is another story:

Bent Paddle Golden IPA

It is amazing to me that a beer with a mid to high alcohol content (6.2% ABV) and bitterness (68 IBU), which would have been considered extreme a few years ago, is positioned as a volume style brand staple. In this regard Bent Hop delivers.

Eschewing the more traditional malt profile—using pilsner, 2-row, and crystal malted grains as opposed to a primarily 2-row and crystal—Bent Paddle starts off with a different flavor base that is unique without being overbearing. If you poured this out of the can into the glass someone would probably think you were firing down an apricot or pumpkin beer instead of an outstanding IPA.

No single hop flavor or aroma particularly stood out on its own, instead the beer has more of a bouquet of flavors and aromas. While I appreciate the dedication of a single hop IPA as a showcase for a single set of flavor and aroma there is a definite skill in blending hops over the course of several additions to build a complementary set of flavors and aromas.

Pick up a can or ask for a pint of Bent Paddle Golden IPA and you will not be disappointed:

Purchase 3 Mug Rating

Lately, I have been down on “summer” beers because I think they are aiming for a lower common denominator of flavors. Plus, most of these derivative beers tend to be lagers which I am quickly slotting into my “dead” category of beer styles. Bent Paddle took a different approach and gave us Paddle Break Blonde:

Bent Paddle Break Blonde

It’s a summer beer by way of Belgian blonde ale. This is what a summer beer should be. It’s light to the palate (20 IBU), but packs enough of an alcohol punch (6% ABV) that you are not going to need to take more than a few before you’re ability to operate machinery of any kind is severely impaired. In fact, it could have stood to come in a little lower in alcohol so you could have more than a few if you so desired. I guess it stays cold up in Duluth a little longer than anywhere else in the Midwest so I am going to cede that style decision to the brewers.

Unlike Bent Paddle where a lot of the character of the beer comes from the hops, in Paddle Break the Belgian style yeast is allowed to shine by giving off esters of flavor that would have been lost in a “bigger” beer. It drinks clean and leaves you wanting more:

Purchase 3 Mug Rating

If you happen to find yourself in Duluth make a stop at the Bent Paddle taproom and enjoy their wares. You will be glad that you made the effort. At the very least, if you find yourself in the distribution area take the time to seek out a six pack or more. Again, it is worth the effort.